Factors Associated with the Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Individuals with Usher Syndrome: A Qualitative Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338960
Title:
Factors Associated with the Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Individuals with Usher Syndrome: A Qualitative Study
Author:
Watters-Miles, Constance
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative study investigated the remembered lived experiences of six individuals who were diagnosed with Usher syndrome, the effect that the progressive condition had upon their lives, and their experiences with vocational rehabilitation. Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition that presents as deafness or hearing loss with comorbid retinitis pigmentosa sometimes with vestibular areflexia. The participants recalled details of their own reaction to the diagnoses as well as the reactions of their parents. Themes were identified in their responses that included independent dependence, Usher support, parental reaction, lowered expectations, hope, and ongoing change. The participants, three men and three women, reported periods of adjustment and sadness as well as hopes for their future, career accomplishments, and social interactions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
deaf; rehabilitation; Usher syndrome; blind; Rehabilitation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Erin, Jane; Sales, Amos P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFactors Associated with the Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Individuals with Usher Syndrome: A Qualitative Studyen_US
dc.creatorWatters-Miles, Constanceen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatters-Miles, Constanceen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study investigated the remembered lived experiences of six individuals who were diagnosed with Usher syndrome, the effect that the progressive condition had upon their lives, and their experiences with vocational rehabilitation. Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition that presents as deafness or hearing loss with comorbid retinitis pigmentosa sometimes with vestibular areflexia. The participants recalled details of their own reaction to the diagnoses as well as the reactions of their parents. Themes were identified in their responses that included independent dependence, Usher support, parental reaction, lowered expectations, hope, and ongoing change. The participants, three men and three women, reported periods of adjustment and sadness as well as hopes for their future, career accomplishments, and social interactions.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectdeafen_US
dc.subjectrehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectUsher syndromeen_US
dc.subjectblinden_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErin, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amos P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberErin, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amos P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Linda R.en_US
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