The Identity Of The Medina, Tripoli, Libya: Conservation And Urban Planning From The Nineteenth Century To The Present

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338903
Title:
The Identity Of The Medina, Tripoli, Libya: Conservation And Urban Planning From The Nineteenth Century To The Present
Author:
Elkekli, Fuzia Taher
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Medina of Tripoli, Libya, is a very ancient walled city that has a history of change, development, deterioration, conservation, and preservation to its fabric. Influenced by various foreign groups (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Muslims, Spanish, Ottomans, Karamanlis), its architectural styles include ancient and traditional structures, as well as modern Western style or acculturation architecture. The purpose of the Medina as a place of habitation has changed over the years because of many factors including residents moving out of the Medina, fluctuating preservation, the changes in government policy when each new ruling entity had its particular laws and regulations, and some distortion of the economy due to the oil revenues. The place has no long-term plan or vision applied to it--either from within or from without. This study, the first of its kind in North Africa to collect information by using surveys and mental maps, convert the information into geographic information system (GIS) data, and come to definite conclusions about the Medina's situation. The entire research focused on four areas (the Islamic buildings, common routes of transportation, areas of deterioration, and population densities within Tripoli's Medina), but this document focused on the deterioration in the city while analyzing its urban informality, the residents' rights to live in the city, and property categories. This study helped to clarify the current situation and provide input to planners in post-uprising Libya.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Geographic information system; Medina's Tripoli; Libya; Mental maps; Urban informality; Urban planning; Conservation; Geography
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christopherson, Gary L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Identity Of The Medina, Tripoli, Libya: Conservation And Urban Planning From The Nineteenth Century To The Presenten_US
dc.creatorElkekli, Fuzia Taheren_US
dc.contributor.authorElkekli, Fuzia Taheren_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Medina of Tripoli, Libya, is a very ancient walled city that has a history of change, development, deterioration, conservation, and preservation to its fabric. Influenced by various foreign groups (Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Muslims, Spanish, Ottomans, Karamanlis), its architectural styles include ancient and traditional structures, as well as modern Western style or acculturation architecture. The purpose of the Medina as a place of habitation has changed over the years because of many factors including residents moving out of the Medina, fluctuating preservation, the changes in government policy when each new ruling entity had its particular laws and regulations, and some distortion of the economy due to the oil revenues. The place has no long-term plan or vision applied to it--either from within or from without. This study, the first of its kind in North Africa to collect information by using surveys and mental maps, convert the information into geographic information system (GIS) data, and come to definite conclusions about the Medina's situation. The entire research focused on four areas (the Islamic buildings, common routes of transportation, areas of deterioration, and population densities within Tripoli's Medina), but this document focused on the deterioration in the city while analyzing its urban informality, the residents' rights to live in the city, and property categories. This study helped to clarify the current situation and provide input to planners in post-uprising Libya.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectGeographic information systemen_US
dc.subjectMedina's Tripolien_US
dc.subjectLibyaen_US
dc.subjectMental mapsen_US
dc.subjectUrban informalityen_US
dc.subjectUrban planningen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoum, Aomaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoshi, Sapanaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, Sarahen_US
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