Predicting Early Academic Achievement: An Investigation of the Contribution of Executive Function

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338873
Title:
Predicting Early Academic Achievement: An Investigation of the Contribution of Executive Function
Author:
Jerauld, Joy Meredith
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the important question of whether pupils' executive functions (EF) predict early academic achievement. Current conceptualizations suggest that developmental trends in EF can be measured in young children and that EF may play an important role in predicting academic achievement and school readiness. To date, however, there is little empirical support for this assertion. This study explored EF skills of 3- to 5 year-olds using the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task (DCCS). The first objective was to determine if EF indeed predicts math, reading, and writing achievement in 3- to 5-year-olds. The second objective was to determine if EF's prediction of academics occurs independent of the contribution made by general ability (e.g., Battelle motor and language subdomains). The third objective was to determine if the contribution of EF remains uniform across the age span. Consequently, existing data from 969 participants between 54 to 71 months was used. This consisted of scores on the DCCS as well as the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS) to measure early reading and writing skills, the Test of Early Math Ability -Third Edition (TEMA-3) to measure early math skills, and sections of the Battelle Developmental Inventory 2nd Edition (BDI- 2) to measure general development. A positive relationship between EF and early math, reading, and writing skills was found. Also EF, as measured by the DCCS, contributed a significant portion of variance in early math, reading, and writing skills after accounting for general development, age, and socioeconomic status. Finally, the contribution of EF to early reading and writing skills remained stable between 3 and 5 years old. In contrast, EF was a stronger predictor of early math skills among 3-year-olds when compared to 5- year-olds.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Executive Function; school readiness; DCCS; School Psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wodrich, David
Committee Chair:
Wodrich, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePredicting Early Academic Achievement: An Investigation of the Contribution of Executive Functionen_US
dc.creatorJerauld, Joy Meredithen_US
dc.contributor.authorJerauld, Joy Meredithen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the important question of whether pupils' executive functions (EF) predict early academic achievement. Current conceptualizations suggest that developmental trends in EF can be measured in young children and that EF may play an important role in predicting academic achievement and school readiness. To date, however, there is little empirical support for this assertion. This study explored EF skills of 3- to 5 year-olds using the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task (DCCS). The first objective was to determine if EF indeed predicts math, reading, and writing achievement in 3- to 5-year-olds. The second objective was to determine if EF's prediction of academics occurs independent of the contribution made by general ability (e.g., Battelle motor and language subdomains). The third objective was to determine if the contribution of EF remains uniform across the age span. Consequently, existing data from 969 participants between 54 to 71 months was used. This consisted of scores on the DCCS as well as the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS) to measure early reading and writing skills, the Test of Early Math Ability -Third Edition (TEMA-3) to measure early math skills, and sections of the Battelle Developmental Inventory 2nd Edition (BDI- 2) to measure general development. A positive relationship between EF and early math, reading, and writing skills was found. Also EF, as measured by the DCCS, contributed a significant portion of variance in early math, reading, and writing skills after accounting for general development, age, and socioeconomic status. Finally, the contribution of EF to early reading and writing skills remained stable between 3 and 5 years old. In contrast, EF was a stronger predictor of early math skills among 3-year-olds when compared to 5- year-olds.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectExecutive Functionen_US
dc.subjectschool readinessen_US
dc.subjectDCCSen_US
dc.subjectSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWodrich, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.chairWodrich, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWodrich, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPerfect, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYaden, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCimetta, Adrianaen_US
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