A Methodology for Mending Dynamic Constraint Violations in Cyber Physical Systems By Generating Model Transformations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338756
Title:
A Methodology for Mending Dynamic Constraint Violations in Cyber Physical Systems By Generating Model Transformations
Author:
Whitsitt, Sean
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are defined as the combination of computational elements with physical components. Systems that require communication, computation, and control are by definition CPSs. The complexity of these systems often grows exponentially as they incorporate more elements into their design. As such, many approaches to designing CPSs revolve around the development of Domain Specific Modeling Languages (DSMLs). DSMLs drastically reduce the development time for CPSs by abstracting elements of the development process to a high level. DSMLs can be constrained in such a way that it is impossible to construct structurally invalid models of CPSs. This allows designers to think abstractly and ignore time consuming low level implementation details. However, these methods do not prevent designers from constructing systems that can be invalid in other, more dynamic, ways. That is, structural constraints on a DSML for a CPS do not prevent constraint violations where some analysis must be performed on the system to verify that the constraint has been satisfied. In the state-of-the-art, it is violations on these dynamic constraints that modelers must spend their time designing around. Dynamic constraints can be incorporated into the framework of a DSML by integrating the concepts of automatic feedback control into the DSML with model transformations. The methodology that describes this new approach to Domain Specific Modeling (DSM) is called Dynamic Constraint Feedback (DCF). At a glance: first a DSML is created for a CPS. Next, an interface is developed for two-way interaction between the DSML and external tools. Third, an expert block that can perform analysis on the models is created. The expert block is responsible for determining constraint violations and solutions. Lastly, model transformations are generated based on expert block output and applied to the existing models. This process repeats until a solution is either found or declared to be unreachable.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Dynamic Constraints; Model Transformations; Cyber Physical Systems; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sprinkle, Jonathan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Methodology for Mending Dynamic Constraint Violations in Cyber Physical Systems By Generating Model Transformationsen_US
dc.creatorWhitsitt, Seanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitsitt, Seanen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are defined as the combination of computational elements with physical components. Systems that require communication, computation, and control are by definition CPSs. The complexity of these systems often grows exponentially as they incorporate more elements into their design. As such, many approaches to designing CPSs revolve around the development of Domain Specific Modeling Languages (DSMLs). DSMLs drastically reduce the development time for CPSs by abstracting elements of the development process to a high level. DSMLs can be constrained in such a way that it is impossible to construct structurally invalid models of CPSs. This allows designers to think abstractly and ignore time consuming low level implementation details. However, these methods do not prevent designers from constructing systems that can be invalid in other, more dynamic, ways. That is, structural constraints on a DSML for a CPS do not prevent constraint violations where some analysis must be performed on the system to verify that the constraint has been satisfied. In the state-of-the-art, it is violations on these dynamic constraints that modelers must spend their time designing around. Dynamic constraints can be incorporated into the framework of a DSML by integrating the concepts of automatic feedback control into the DSML with model transformations. The methodology that describes this new approach to Domain Specific Modeling (DSM) is called Dynamic Constraint Feedback (DCF). At a glance: first a DSML is created for a CPS. Next, an interface is developed for two-way interaction between the DSML and external tools. Third, an expert block that can perform analysis on the models is created. The expert block is responsible for determining constraint violations and solutions. Lastly, model transformations are generated based on expert block output and applied to the existing models. This process repeats until a solution is either found or declared to be unreachable.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDynamic Constraintsen_US
dc.subjectModel Transformationsen_US
dc.subjectCyber Physical Systemsen_US
dc.subjectElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSprinkle, Jonathanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSprinkle, Jonathanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLysecky, Romanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTharp, Halen_US
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