Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338734
Title:
Hot-melt Extrusion Through Syringes
Author:
O'Connell, Sean Patrick
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of solid dispersions to formulate poorly water soluble drugs is a growing field in the pharmaceutical sciences. Hot-melt extrusion is a common method for producing dispersions. However, bench-top extruders require large amounts of powder to run and are inappropriate for early formulation screens. Plastic and glass syringes are readily available in most laboratories. 250 mg of drug-polymer blend is placed in a plastic syringe body that has the tip covered with a bent needle. The syringe is heated for 5 minutes and the extrudate is pushed through the syringe. Extrudates are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder x-ray diffraction. Acetaminophen, griseofulvin, indomethacin, salicylamide, and sulfamethoxazole extruded with polyvinylpyrrolidone K12 match or exceed the performance of solvent evaporated controls. Glass syringes can be used when polymers have processing ranges above the melting point of the plastic syringes. Syringe extrusion is effectively demonstrated as a rapid process for early formulation screening.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
extrusion; hot-melt; polyvinylpyrrolidone; soluplus; syringe; dispersion; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Yalkowsky, Samuel H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHot-melt Extrusion Through Syringesen_US
dc.creatorO'Connell, Sean Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Sean Patricken_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of solid dispersions to formulate poorly water soluble drugs is a growing field in the pharmaceutical sciences. Hot-melt extrusion is a common method for producing dispersions. However, bench-top extruders require large amounts of powder to run and are inappropriate for early formulation screens. Plastic and glass syringes are readily available in most laboratories. 250 mg of drug-polymer blend is placed in a plastic syringe body that has the tip covered with a bent needle. The syringe is heated for 5 minutes and the extrudate is pushed through the syringe. Extrudates are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder x-ray diffraction. Acetaminophen, griseofulvin, indomethacin, salicylamide, and sulfamethoxazole extruded with polyvinylpyrrolidone K12 match or exceed the performance of solvent evaporated controls. Glass syringes can be used when polymers have processing ranges above the melting point of the plastic syringes. Syringe extrusion is effectively demonstrated as a rapid process for early formulation screening.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectextrusionen_US
dc.subjecthot-melten_US
dc.subjectpolyvinylpyrrolidoneen_US
dc.subjectsoluplusen_US
dc.subjectsyringeen_US
dc.subjectdispersionen_US
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYalkowsky, Samuel H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYalkowsky, Samuel H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMayersohn, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMyrdal, Paul B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMansour, Heidi M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCherrington, Nathan J.en_US
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