The Spectrum of Discourse: A Case Study Utilizing Critical Race Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/338708
Title:
The Spectrum of Discourse: A Case Study Utilizing Critical Race Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis
Author:
Aleshire, Seth Peter
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This case study provides empirical evidence of the master and counternarrative described by Critical Race Theory (CRT) and seeks to understand the impact of these narratives in educational policy and practice. In 2010, Arizona passed A.R.S. §15-112, a law that was designed to eliminate the Mexican American Studies (MAS) program in the Tucson Unified School District. Utilizing the literature on culturally-relevant pedagogy and leadership, this case study uses a CRT theoretical framework and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) methodology to analyze the narratives of 26 participants. While the program was under investigation by the State for violation of A.R.S. §15-112 all of the teachers involved in MAS participated in qualitative interviews. In addition, this case study analyzes the narratives of two student focus groups, school administrators, and district governing board members well as the written findings of two former State Superintendents of Public Instruction both of whom found the program in violation of the law. By specifically focusing on the styles and genres described in a CDA methodology the findings provide evidence of both the master and counternarrative but also a spectrum of discourse in which other forms of narrative reside. Implications from this research include a more complex theory of discourse beyond the dichotomy of the master and counternarrative, the application of a new methodological tool in CRT, and recommendations for educational leaders and policy makers interested in advocating for a culturally relevant approach.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Critical Race Theory; Culturally Relevant Pedagogy; Mexican American Studies; Educational Leadership; Critical Discourse Analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bennett, Jeffrey P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Spectrum of Discourse: A Case Study Utilizing Critical Race Theory and Critical Discourse Analysisen_US
dc.creatorAleshire, Seth Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorAleshire, Seth Peteren_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis case study provides empirical evidence of the master and counternarrative described by Critical Race Theory (CRT) and seeks to understand the impact of these narratives in educational policy and practice. In 2010, Arizona passed A.R.S. §15-112, a law that was designed to eliminate the Mexican American Studies (MAS) program in the Tucson Unified School District. Utilizing the literature on culturally-relevant pedagogy and leadership, this case study uses a CRT theoretical framework and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) methodology to analyze the narratives of 26 participants. While the program was under investigation by the State for violation of A.R.S. §15-112 all of the teachers involved in MAS participated in qualitative interviews. In addition, this case study analyzes the narratives of two student focus groups, school administrators, and district governing board members well as the written findings of two former State Superintendents of Public Instruction both of whom found the program in violation of the law. By specifically focusing on the styles and genres described in a CDA methodology the findings provide evidence of both the master and counternarrative but also a spectrum of discourse in which other forms of narrative reside. Implications from this research include a more complex theory of discourse beyond the dichotomy of the master and counternarrative, the application of a new methodological tool in CRT, and recommendations for educational leaders and policy makers interested in advocating for a culturally relevant approach.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCritical Race Theoryen_US
dc.subjectCulturally Relevant Pedagogyen_US
dc.subjectMexican American Studiesen_US
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectCritical Discourse Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBennett, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBennett, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrunderman, Lynnetteen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCabrera, Nolanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYlimaki, Roseen_US
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