Consequences of Morphine Administration in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain: Using the Pitfalls of Morphine Therapy to Develop Targeted Adjunct Strategies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/337378
Title:
Consequences of Morphine Administration in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain: Using the Pitfalls of Morphine Therapy to Develop Targeted Adjunct Strategies
Author:
Liguori, Ashley Michele
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 06-Oct-2015
Abstract:
Many common cancers have a predisposition for bone metastasis. Tumor occupation of bone is both destructive and a source of debilitating pain in cancer patients. As a result, cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is the single most common form of clinical cancer pain. Opioids remain the golden standard for the management of CIBP; however, >30% of cancer patients do not experience adequate pain relief with opioids. Furthermore, clinical reports have suggested that opioids can exacerbate bone loss and increase the likelihood of skeletal-related events. To date, there is no known direct mechanism for opioid-induced bone loss (OIBL). We hypothesized that opioid off-target activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor that is expressed in bone, mediates an increase bone loss and associated CIBP. In the 66.1-BALB/cfC3H murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis, TLR4 expression is upregulated in tumor-burdened bone. Chronic morphine treatment exacerbated spontaneous and evoked pain behaviors in a manner paralleled by bone loss: we identified an increase in spontaneous fracture and osteolysis markers including serum collagen-type I (CTX) and intramedullary receptor activator of nuclear κ-B ligand (RANKL). Administration of (+)naloxone, a non-opioid TLR4 antagonist, attenuated both exacerbation of CIBP and morphine-induced osteolytic changes in vivo. Morphine did not alter tumor burden in vivo or tumor cell growth in vitro. Importantly, morphine produced the in vitro differentiation and activation of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner that was reversible with (+)naloxone, suggesting that morphine may contribute directly to osteolytic activation. To improve opioid management of CIBP, we then posited and evaluated three novel adjunct therapeutic targets: cannabinoid receptor-2, adenosine 3 receptor and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1. These pharmacological targets were identified as having a multiplicity of anti-cancer, osteoprotective and/or neuroprotective effects in addition to analgesic efficacy in chronic pain. Targets were tested in the 66.1-BALB/cfC3H model of CIBP and demonstrated to have stand-alone efficacy as antinociceptive agents. Taken together, this work provides a cautionary evaluation of opioid therapy in cancer-induced bone pain and seeks to mitigate opioid side effects through the identification of innovative adjunct therapies that can ultimately improve quality of life in patients suffering from cancer pain.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
bone pain; cancer pain; morphine; opioid; toll-like receptor 4; Medical Pharmacology; bone loss
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Medical Pharmacology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vanderah, Todd W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleConsequences of Morphine Administration in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain: Using the Pitfalls of Morphine Therapy to Develop Targeted Adjunct Strategiesen_US
dc.creatorLiguori, Ashley Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiguori, Ashley Micheleen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 06-Oct-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractMany common cancers have a predisposition for bone metastasis. Tumor occupation of bone is both destructive and a source of debilitating pain in cancer patients. As a result, cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is the single most common form of clinical cancer pain. Opioids remain the golden standard for the management of CIBP; however, >30% of cancer patients do not experience adequate pain relief with opioids. Furthermore, clinical reports have suggested that opioids can exacerbate bone loss and increase the likelihood of skeletal-related events. To date, there is no known direct mechanism for opioid-induced bone loss (OIBL). We hypothesized that opioid off-target activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor that is expressed in bone, mediates an increase bone loss and associated CIBP. In the 66.1-BALB/cfC3H murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis, TLR4 expression is upregulated in tumor-burdened bone. Chronic morphine treatment exacerbated spontaneous and evoked pain behaviors in a manner paralleled by bone loss: we identified an increase in spontaneous fracture and osteolysis markers including serum collagen-type I (CTX) and intramedullary receptor activator of nuclear κ-B ligand (RANKL). Administration of (+)naloxone, a non-opioid TLR4 antagonist, attenuated both exacerbation of CIBP and morphine-induced osteolytic changes in vivo. Morphine did not alter tumor burden in vivo or tumor cell growth in vitro. Importantly, morphine produced the in vitro differentiation and activation of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner that was reversible with (+)naloxone, suggesting that morphine may contribute directly to osteolytic activation. To improve opioid management of CIBP, we then posited and evaluated three novel adjunct therapeutic targets: cannabinoid receptor-2, adenosine 3 receptor and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1. These pharmacological targets were identified as having a multiplicity of anti-cancer, osteoprotective and/or neuroprotective effects in addition to analgesic efficacy in chronic pain. Targets were tested in the 66.1-BALB/cfC3H model of CIBP and demonstrated to have stand-alone efficacy as antinociceptive agents. Taken together, this work provides a cautionary evaluation of opioid therapy in cancer-induced bone pain and seeks to mitigate opioid side effects through the identification of innovative adjunct therapies that can ultimately improve quality of life in patients suffering from cancer pain.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectbone painen_US
dc.subjectcancer painen_US
dc.subjectmorphineen_US
dc.subjectopioiden_US
dc.subjecttoll-like receptor 4en_US
dc.subjectMedical Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subjectbone lossen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMedical Pharmacologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVanderah, Todd W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVanderah, Todd W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrench, Edward D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKhanna, Rajesh.en_US
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