Housing for the Hopi Community: Designing Sustainable, Affordable and Energy Efficient Housing in the Hopi Community, Linking to Cultural Patterns of Sustainability

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/337371
Title:
Housing for the Hopi Community: Designing Sustainable, Affordable and Energy Efficient Housing in the Hopi Community, Linking to Cultural Patterns of Sustainability
Author:
LaMantia, Rachel
Issue Date:
18-Dec-2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This case study examines housing on the Hopi reservation, both traditional and contemporary and aims to create a future type of housing that will contribute to addressing the critical housing needs and alternative solutions addressing substandard housing on and for the Hopi people. Westernization has created a plague of substandard housing on the reservation that ignores pre-existing vernacular architecture and thus, the environment and the culture of the Hopi people. Rather, Westernization has created a move toward inexpensive, and quick but highly inefficient types of housing. The housing situation on Hopi presents a critical need for solution, an alternative to the substandard housing by creating a housing design that is sustainable, affordable and energy efficient. This solution can be found by (re)linking to cultural patterns of sustainability, essentially the history of a cultural people which includes traditional housing methods and materials. Traditional Hopi housing was studied and a list of common strategies was compiled from traditional houses on the reservation into a Basecase. Modern strategies were applied to the Basecase to create a Newcase. The percent savings in annual energy use and annual operation costs were compared between the two cases, however, it is important to note that the results were skewed due to a variety of factors that are discussed as limitations in the study. Nevertheless, the study offered an alternative housing solution, one that demonstrated significant savings in annual energy use and operation costs.
Description:
Sustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone
Type:
text (PDF)
Keywords:
Architecture, Traditional Building, Hopi, Sustainable, Energy Efficient
Degree Program:
College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture
Mentor:
Chalfoun, Dr. Nader
Instructor:
Keith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaMantia, Rachelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-18T04:47:35Zen
dc.date.available2014-12-18T04:47:35Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-18en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/337371en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstoneen_US
dc.description.abstractThis case study examines housing on the Hopi reservation, both traditional and contemporary and aims to create a future type of housing that will contribute to addressing the critical housing needs and alternative solutions addressing substandard housing on and for the Hopi people. Westernization has created a plague of substandard housing on the reservation that ignores pre-existing vernacular architecture and thus, the environment and the culture of the Hopi people. Rather, Westernization has created a move toward inexpensive, and quick but highly inefficient types of housing. The housing situation on Hopi presents a critical need for solution, an alternative to the substandard housing by creating a housing design that is sustainable, affordable and energy efficient. This solution can be found by (re)linking to cultural patterns of sustainability, essentially the history of a cultural people which includes traditional housing methods and materials. Traditional Hopi housing was studied and a list of common strategies was compiled from traditional houses on the reservation into a Basecase. Modern strategies were applied to the Basecase to create a Newcase. The percent savings in annual energy use and annual operation costs were compared between the two cases, however, it is important to note that the results were skewed due to a variety of factors that are discussed as limitations in the study. Nevertheless, the study offered an alternative housing solution, one that demonstrated significant savings in annual energy use and operation costs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture, Traditional Building, Hopi, Sustainable, Energy Efficienten_US
dc.titleHousing for the Hopi Community: Designing Sustainable, Affordable and Energy Efficient Housing in the Hopi Community, Linking to Cultural Patterns of Sustainabilityen_US
dc.typetext (PDF)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorChalfoun, Dr. Naderen_US
dc.contributor.instructorKeith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joeyen_US
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