Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/337345
Title:
Water Supplies in the Southwest Making a Finite Supply Sustainable for a Growing Population
Author:
Santillan, Steven
Issue Date:
17-Dec-2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Across the world, populations continue to grow while water supplies stay fixed. In the American Southwest, water supplies are at an all time low, yet warm, favorable conditions continue to lure residents to the area. With some of the country’s lowest fresh water reserves, it is imperative that changes are made to water usage trends and associated energy inefficiencies. An analysis of water usage in Tucson was conducted to evaluate potential solutions for reducing consumption and to correspondingly shrink energy usage. Case studies were investigated, census numbers were used to roughly calculate statistics, existing knowledge on water conservation techniques were researched, and alternative water filtration as well as distribution systems were scrutinized for their viability amongst current infrastructure. The potential to reduce water usage is greatest with the largest user of water in Tucson, the single-family residence. On average the single-family residence is capable of effectively saving nearly 25,000 gallons of water per year with efficient fixtures, another 25,000 gallons per year by reducing outdoor water use by half, and another 10,625 gallons by utilizing rainwater harvesting. Combine those savings and multiply them by the 225,000-240,000 single-family residents estimated to be in Tucson and the savings reach more than five billion gallons a year, effectively almost cutting water consumption in Tucson by a fifth. Further, to keep remaining usage impacts negligible, implementation of an indirect or direct potable water reuse system could satisfy populations for decades by reusing water that would normally be discarded as effluent. Water consumption must be curved so that it can satisfy a growing population’s needs. Amongst residents of Tucson, single-family residences have the greatest potential to reduce water and associated energy needs. Through conservation techniques, water harvesting, reducing outdoor water usage, and potable reuse, limited water supplies can satisfy future generations to come.
Description:
Sustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Project
Type:
text; poster
Keywords:
water; water conservation; Tucson; potable reuse; water harvesting; decentralized systems
Degree Name:
Sustainable Built Environments
Mentor:
Snyder, Dr. Shane
Instructor:
Iuliano, Joey; Keith, Ladd

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSantillan, Stevenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-17T18:16:17Zen
dc.date.available2014-12-17T18:16:17Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-17en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/337345en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Projecten_US
dc.description.abstractAcross the world, populations continue to grow while water supplies stay fixed. In the American Southwest, water supplies are at an all time low, yet warm, favorable conditions continue to lure residents to the area. With some of the country’s lowest fresh water reserves, it is imperative that changes are made to water usage trends and associated energy inefficiencies. An analysis of water usage in Tucson was conducted to evaluate potential solutions for reducing consumption and to correspondingly shrink energy usage. Case studies were investigated, census numbers were used to roughly calculate statistics, existing knowledge on water conservation techniques were researched, and alternative water filtration as well as distribution systems were scrutinized for their viability amongst current infrastructure. The potential to reduce water usage is greatest with the largest user of water in Tucson, the single-family residence. On average the single-family residence is capable of effectively saving nearly 25,000 gallons of water per year with efficient fixtures, another 25,000 gallons per year by reducing outdoor water use by half, and another 10,625 gallons by utilizing rainwater harvesting. Combine those savings and multiply them by the 225,000-240,000 single-family residents estimated to be in Tucson and the savings reach more than five billion gallons a year, effectively almost cutting water consumption in Tucson by a fifth. Further, to keep remaining usage impacts negligible, implementation of an indirect or direct potable water reuse system could satisfy populations for decades by reusing water that would normally be discarded as effluent. Water consumption must be curved so that it can satisfy a growing population’s needs. Amongst residents of Tucson, single-family residences have the greatest potential to reduce water and associated energy needs. Through conservation techniques, water harvesting, reducing outdoor water usage, and potable reuse, limited water supplies can satisfy future generations to come.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectwateren_US
dc.subjectwater conservationen_US
dc.subjectTucsonen_US
dc.subjectpotable reuseen_US
dc.subjectwater harvestingen_US
dc.subjectdecentralized systemsen_US
dc.titleWater Supplies in the Southwest Making a Finite Supply Sustainable for a Growing Populationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeposteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameSustainable Built Environmentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorSnyder, Dr. Shaneen_US
dc.contributor.instructorIuliano, Joeyen_US
dc.contributor.instructorKeith, Ladden_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.