Societal & Health Benefits from the Implementation of Urban Agriculture & Examining the Feasibility of Micro Urban Agriculture in Two Tucson, AZ Census Tracts

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/337344
Title:
Societal & Health Benefits from the Implementation of Urban Agriculture & Examining the Feasibility of Micro Urban Agriculture in Two Tucson, AZ Census Tracts
Author:
Wenzel, Holly
Issue Date:
17-Dec-2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The thesis focuses on the effects urban agriculture could have on a community and the nation. By examining current states of mental health, physical health, and societal health through the lenses of current obesity rates, driving, being outdoors, and the current agricultural system, a conclusion was formed that urban agriculture would promote overall health. Two Census tracts within Tucson, AZ, 37.01, and 21, were closely examined on the feasibility of implementing urban agriculture within their communities. The thesis resulted with the conclusion that further health studies in the tracts were necessary, but that areas with access to reclaimed water could begin implementing micro urban agriculture.
Description:
Sustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone
Type:
text (PDF)
Keywords:
urban agriculture; health; urban design; planning
Mentor:
Vint, Bob
Instructor:
Keith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWenzel, Hollyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-17T18:16:07Zen
dc.date.available2014-12-17T18:16:07Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12-17en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/337344en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstoneen_US
dc.description.abstractThe thesis focuses on the effects urban agriculture could have on a community and the nation. By examining current states of mental health, physical health, and societal health through the lenses of current obesity rates, driving, being outdoors, and the current agricultural system, a conclusion was formed that urban agriculture would promote overall health. Two Census tracts within Tucson, AZ, 37.01, and 21, were closely examined on the feasibility of implementing urban agriculture within their communities. The thesis resulted with the conclusion that further health studies in the tracts were necessary, but that areas with access to reclaimed water could begin implementing micro urban agriculture.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjecturban agricultureen_US
dc.subjecthealthen_US
dc.subjecturban designen_US
dc.subjectplanningen_US
dc.titleSocietal & Health Benefits from the Implementation of Urban Agriculture & Examining the Feasibility of Micro Urban Agriculture in Two Tucson, AZ Census Tractsen_US
dc.typetext (PDF)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorVint, Boben_US
dc.contributor.instructorKeith, Ladd; Iuliano, Joeyen_US
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