Regions, Powers And Order: A Structural Approach To Regional Politics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/337267
Title:
Regions, Powers And Order: A Structural Approach To Regional Politics
Author:
Bodung, Sverre
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I develop a theory that seeks to account for the variation in stability and conflict proneness we observe across regions. I propose that the observed variation in regional order in the international system is fundamentally rooted in the polar arrangements of the different regions. Specifically, I argue that regions that do not have clearly recognized regional powers are more prone to conflict, that their conflicts are more severe, and that these regions are more vulnerable to outside influence than those that do have such powers. Using an opportunity and willingness framework, I define regions as stable geographic spaces of interacting states behaving uniquely from the broader international system. In order to test these propositions, I make use of novel data defining both regional memberships and that identifies leading regional actors. The results show that not only do regional polarity have a strong explanatory effect, but they also suggest that it is necessary to take regional-level effects into account when analyzing international politics.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Conflict Studies; International Relations Theory; International Security; Polarity; Regions; Political Science; Balance of Power
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Volgy, Thomas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRegions, Powers And Order: A Structural Approach To Regional Politicsen_US
dc.creatorBodung, Sverreen_US
dc.contributor.authorBodung, Sverreen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I develop a theory that seeks to account for the variation in stability and conflict proneness we observe across regions. I propose that the observed variation in regional order in the international system is fundamentally rooted in the polar arrangements of the different regions. Specifically, I argue that regions that do not have clearly recognized regional powers are more prone to conflict, that their conflicts are more severe, and that these regions are more vulnerable to outside influence than those that do have such powers. Using an opportunity and willingness framework, I define regions as stable geographic spaces of interacting states behaving uniquely from the broader international system. In order to test these propositions, I make use of novel data defining both regional memberships and that identifies leading regional actors. The results show that not only do regional polarity have a strong explanatory effect, but they also suggest that it is necessary to take regional-level effects into account when analyzing international politics.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectConflict Studiesen_US
dc.subjectInternational Relations Theoryen_US
dc.subjectInternational Securityen_US
dc.subjectPolarityen_US
dc.subjectRegionsen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.subjectBalance of Poweren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVolgy, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVolgy, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergesen, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDixon, William J,en_US
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