Family Policies and Public Health Initiatives: A Comparative Analysis of Breastfeeding Outcomes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/333485
Title:
Family Policies and Public Health Initiatives: A Comparative Analysis of Breastfeeding Outcomes
Author:
Lubold, Amanda Marie
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Breastfeeding rates vary considerably among high-income countries who are members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In the 1960's, breastfeeding outcomes, both initiation of breastfeeding and breastfeeding duration, were at an all-time low. Over the past half century, breastfeeding outcomes have increased among all OECD countries, but at very different rates. This dissertation examines both the policy-level and public health-level initiatives that have affected the differential growth of breastfeeding rates among 18 high-income, OECD countries. Using a combination of multiple regression, fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis, and small-n methods, I find that countries in the broad Scandinavian welfare regime have combined policy support for women's reproductive and productive labor, along with a strong female representation in government to facilitate positive breastfeeding outcomes. I find that countries who have a strong commitment to the World Health Organization's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative have higher breastfeeding initiation rates than countries who do not have a high percentage of hospitals following the WHO protocol. This dissertation adds to the broader understanding of how welfare state policies and public health initiatives operate in tandem to support positive breastfeeding outcomes among high-income countries.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
family policies; Sociology; breastfeeding
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roth, Louise M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFamily Policies and Public Health Initiatives: A Comparative Analysis of Breastfeeding Outcomesen_US
dc.creatorLubold, Amanda Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLubold, Amanda Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBreastfeeding rates vary considerably among high-income countries who are members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In the 1960's, breastfeeding outcomes, both initiation of breastfeeding and breastfeeding duration, were at an all-time low. Over the past half century, breastfeeding outcomes have increased among all OECD countries, but at very different rates. This dissertation examines both the policy-level and public health-level initiatives that have affected the differential growth of breastfeeding rates among 18 high-income, OECD countries. Using a combination of multiple regression, fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis, and small-n methods, I find that countries in the broad Scandinavian welfare regime have combined policy support for women's reproductive and productive labor, along with a strong female representation in government to facilitate positive breastfeeding outcomes. I find that countries who have a strong commitment to the World Health Organization's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative have higher breastfeeding initiation rates than countries who do not have a high percentage of hospitals following the WHO protocol. This dissertation adds to the broader understanding of how welfare state policies and public health initiatives operate in tandem to support positive breastfeeding outcomes among high-income countries.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectfamily policiesen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoth, Louise M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoth, Louise M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEliason, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKenworthy, Laneen_US
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