Understanding the Effects of Diffusion and Relaxation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Computational Modeling

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/333215
Title:
Understanding the Effects of Diffusion and Relaxation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Computational Modeling
Author:
Russell, Gregory
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 31-Aug-2019
Abstract:
The work described in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to better understand the cellular pathology of ischemic stroke. Two of the three bodies of research presented herein address and issue directly related to the investigation of ischemic stroke through the use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) methods. The first topic concerns the development of a computationally efficient finite difference method, designed to evaluate the impact of microscopic tissue properties on the formation of DWMRI signal. For the second body of work, the effect of changing the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of a restricted sample on clinical DWMRI experiments is explored. The final body of work, while motivated by the desire to understand stroke, addresses the issue of acquiring large amounts of MRI data well suited for quantitative analysis in reduced scan time. In theory, the method could be used to generate quantitative parametric maps, including those depicting information gleaned through the use of DWMRI methods. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to several topics. A description of the use of DWMRI methods in the study of ischemic stroke is covered. An introduction to the fundamental physical principles at work in MRI is also provided. In this section the means by which magnetization is created in MRI experiments, how MRI signal is induced, as well as the influence of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation are discussed. Attention is also given to describing how MRI measurements can be sensitized to diffusion through the use of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the process. Finally, the reader is given a brief introduction to the use of numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. In Chapters 2, 3 and 4, three related bodies of research are presented in terms of research papers. In Chapter 2, a novel computational method is described. The method reduces the computation resources required to simulate DWMRI experiments. In Chapter 3, a detailed study on how changes in the intrinsic intracellular diffusion coefficient may influence clinical DWMRI experiments is described. In Chapter 4, a novel, non-steady state quantitative MRI method is described.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Computational; Diffusion; ischemia; MRI; stroke; Physics; Bloch equations
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Trouard, Theodore; Visscher, Koen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUnderstanding the Effects of Diffusion and Relaxation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Computational Modelingen_US
dc.creatorRussell, Gregoryen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Gregoryen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 31-Aug-2019en_US
dc.description.abstractThe work described in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to better understand the cellular pathology of ischemic stroke. Two of the three bodies of research presented herein address and issue directly related to the investigation of ischemic stroke through the use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) methods. The first topic concerns the development of a computationally efficient finite difference method, designed to evaluate the impact of microscopic tissue properties on the formation of DWMRI signal. For the second body of work, the effect of changing the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of a restricted sample on clinical DWMRI experiments is explored. The final body of work, while motivated by the desire to understand stroke, addresses the issue of acquiring large amounts of MRI data well suited for quantitative analysis in reduced scan time. In theory, the method could be used to generate quantitative parametric maps, including those depicting information gleaned through the use of DWMRI methods. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to several topics. A description of the use of DWMRI methods in the study of ischemic stroke is covered. An introduction to the fundamental physical principles at work in MRI is also provided. In this section the means by which magnetization is created in MRI experiments, how MRI signal is induced, as well as the influence of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation are discussed. Attention is also given to describing how MRI measurements can be sensitized to diffusion through the use of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the process. Finally, the reader is given a brief introduction to the use of numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. In Chapters 2, 3 and 4, three related bodies of research are presented in terms of research papers. In Chapter 2, a novel computational method is described. The method reduces the computation resources required to simulate DWMRI experiments. In Chapter 3, a detailed study on how changes in the intrinsic intracellular diffusion coefficient may influence clinical DWMRI experiments is described. In Chapter 4, a novel, non-steady state quantitative MRI method is described.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectComputationalen_US
dc.subjectDiffusionen_US
dc.subjectischemiaen_US
dc.subjectMRIen_US
dc.subjectstrokeen_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
dc.subjectBloch equationsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTrouard, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVisscher, Koenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTrouard, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVisscher, Koenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStafford, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalons, Jean Philippeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSecomb, Timothyen_US
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