Development And Application Of An Online Tool For Meta-Analyses Using Design Science Principles

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/333036
Title:
Development And Application Of An Online Tool For Meta-Analyses Using Design Science Principles
Author:
Giboney, Justin Scott
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Nations are becoming increasingly sensitive about securing their borders, leading border security organizations to investigate systems designed to detect deception through linguistic analysis. As research about linguistic deception still has resulted in competing hypotheses, this dissertation uses a design science, information systems approach to build a system that synthesizes research on the linguistics of deception. It also performs a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide information about linguistics of deception to border security organizations. This dissertation outlines features that should be included in collaborative meta-analysis tools: process restriction, task organization, information sharing, task coordination, terminology definition, and simple interfaces. These features are discussed and implemented in a new system www.OrionShoulders.com. Through a systematic review and a behavioral experiment on linguistic of deception using the new system, this dissertation identified seven behavioral and cognitive constructs that could be measured through linguistics during deception: cognitive load, event recollection, guilt, credibility portrayal, distancing, dominant behavior, and hedging. This dissertation contributes a theoretical model that explains these seven constructs and how they are measured. The results of the systematic review and the behavioral experiment showed that hedging terms, first-person pronouns, negative emotion, generalizing terms, and the quantity of words were significantly correlated with deception.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Linguistics; Meta-Analysis Software; Management Information Systems; Deception
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management Information Systems
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F. Jr

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDevelopment And Application Of An Online Tool For Meta-Analyses Using Design Science Principlesen_US
dc.creatorGiboney, Justin Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorGiboney, Justin Scotten_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNations are becoming increasingly sensitive about securing their borders, leading border security organizations to investigate systems designed to detect deception through linguistic analysis. As research about linguistic deception still has resulted in competing hypotheses, this dissertation uses a design science, information systems approach to build a system that synthesizes research on the linguistics of deception. It also performs a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide information about linguistics of deception to border security organizations. This dissertation outlines features that should be included in collaborative meta-analysis tools: process restriction, task organization, information sharing, task coordination, terminology definition, and simple interfaces. These features are discussed and implemented in a new system www.OrionShoulders.com. Through a systematic review and a behavioral experiment on linguistic of deception using the new system, this dissertation identified seven behavioral and cognitive constructs that could be measured through linguistics during deception: cognitive load, event recollection, guilt, credibility portrayal, distancing, dominant behavior, and hedging. This dissertation contributes a theoretical model that explains these seven constructs and how they are measured. The results of the systematic review and the behavioral experiment showed that hedging terms, first-person pronouns, negative emotion, generalizing terms, and the quantity of words were significantly correlated with deception.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectMeta-Analysis Softwareen_US
dc.subjectManagement Information Systemsen_US
dc.subjectDeceptionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F. Jren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jay F. Jren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Susan A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberValacich, Joseph S.en_US
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