Vidas al Otro Lado: Acts of Representation Through Transnational Cultural Events

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332881
Title:
Vidas al Otro Lado: Acts of Representation Through Transnational Cultural Events
Author:
Barajas, Alejandrina
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project examines the connections between popular Mexican celebrations, such as Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe and Día de los muertos, and transnational communities established in the United States in order to better understand the functions and ways in which cultural events and non-governmental organizations contribute to the (re)articulation of identity, representation, and community building in communities of residency. The aim is to study in depth the connections between Mexican transnational communities, many of them indigenous, and these popular cultural celebrations and events that take place in Mexico and in the United States. There are two regions in which transnational migrants from the Mixtec region in southern Mexico reside in significant numbers: the New York Metropolitan area, especially in New York City, and Southern California. In my analysis, I apply an eclectic methodology, stemming from Cultural Studies, Performance Studies, and Border Studies while also engaging with the work of Mexican academics in the field of Transnationalism and Anthropology. My project contends that these events reveal transnational and transregional elements that contribute to fulfill the needs of immigrants in the United States, many of who live in this country undocumented. The dissertation demonstrates how Mexican transnational communities participate in a complex system of networks that go beyond the binary perspective traditionally considered in migration studies of communities of origin and communities of arrival, while responding to a greater need to study transnational cultural events from a bi-national perspective.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe; Día de los muertos; Mexican Events; Transnationalism; Spanish; Culture
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Spanish
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Duran, Javier D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleVidas al Otro Lado: Acts of Representation Through Transnational Cultural Eventsen_US
dc.creatorBarajas, Alejandrinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarajas, Alejandrinaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project examines the connections between popular Mexican celebrations, such as Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe and Día de los muertos, and transnational communities established in the United States in order to better understand the functions and ways in which cultural events and non-governmental organizations contribute to the (re)articulation of identity, representation, and community building in communities of residency. The aim is to study in depth the connections between Mexican transnational communities, many of them indigenous, and these popular cultural celebrations and events that take place in Mexico and in the United States. There are two regions in which transnational migrants from the Mixtec region in southern Mexico reside in significant numbers: the New York Metropolitan area, especially in New York City, and Southern California. In my analysis, I apply an eclectic methodology, stemming from Cultural Studies, Performance Studies, and Border Studies while also engaging with the work of Mexican academics in the field of Transnationalism and Anthropology. My project contends that these events reveal transnational and transregional elements that contribute to fulfill the needs of immigrants in the United States, many of who live in this country undocumented. The dissertation demonstrates how Mexican transnational communities participate in a complex system of networks that go beyond the binary perspective traditionally considered in migration studies of communities of origin and communities of arrival, while responding to a greater need to study transnational cultural events from a bi-national perspective.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDía de la Virgen de Guadalupeen_US
dc.subjectDía de los muertosen_US
dc.subjectMexican Eventsen_US
dc.subjectTransnationalismen_US
dc.subjectSpanishen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDuran, Javier D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDuran, Javier D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitch, Melissa A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGutiérrez-Escarpita, Lauraen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.