Poisoning the Well: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, Mexico (1880-1942)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332848
Title:
Poisoning the Well: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, Mexico (1880-1942)
Author:
Gomez, Rocio
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After the Mining Code of 1884, Zacatecas residents saw the mining industry encroach on their water sources and menace the public health of the city. The Code allowed for the privatization of land by foreign nationals, denouncements of mines, and water rights to local sources. Municipal officials and residents soon faced a shortage of drinking water and firewood as severe drought settled in the region, along with a devastating monetary crisis. Residents voiced public health concerns with cholera, floods, and abattoirs and pushed for investment in water infrastructure, rabies vaccines, and drainage projects. Miners established unions to represent their claims in injuries and to have silicosis-tuberculosis recognized as an occupational disease. Using public and private archives, newspapers, union documents, and government correspondence, this study demonstrates how municipal officials and mining companies understood public health and occupational health, and to what extent residents tolerated the industry's hold on water. While the historiography of the city emphasizes the economics of colonial silver mining, this study examines the social and environmental links between the industry and the city as mining companies blocked union activity and water management efforts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Modern Mexican History; Occupational Health; Porfiriato; Water; Zacatecas; History; Mining History
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beezley, William H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePoisoning the Well: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas, Mexico (1880-1942)en_US
dc.creatorGomez, Rocioen_US
dc.contributor.authorGomez, Rocioen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter the Mining Code of 1884, Zacatecas residents saw the mining industry encroach on their water sources and menace the public health of the city. The Code allowed for the privatization of land by foreign nationals, denouncements of mines, and water rights to local sources. Municipal officials and residents soon faced a shortage of drinking water and firewood as severe drought settled in the region, along with a devastating monetary crisis. Residents voiced public health concerns with cholera, floods, and abattoirs and pushed for investment in water infrastructure, rabies vaccines, and drainage projects. Miners established unions to represent their claims in injuries and to have silicosis-tuberculosis recognized as an occupational disease. Using public and private archives, newspapers, union documents, and government correspondence, this study demonstrates how municipal officials and mining companies understood public health and occupational health, and to what extent residents tolerated the industry's hold on water. While the historiography of the city emphasizes the economics of colonial silver mining, this study examines the social and environmental links between the industry and the city as mining companies blocked union activity and water management efforts.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectModern Mexican Historyen_US
dc.subjectOccupational Healthen_US
dc.subjectPorfiriatoen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectZacatecasen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectMining Historyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeezley, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeezley, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGosner, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarickman, Bert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrissey, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeiner, Douglasen_US
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