Neurons In The Monkey Amygdala Detect Eye Contact During Naturalistic Social Interactions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332845
Title:
Neurons In The Monkey Amygdala Detect Eye Contact During Naturalistic Social Interactions
Author:
Mosher, Clayton Paul
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Eye contact is a fundamental means of social interaction among primates. In both humans and non-human primate societies, eye contact precedes and signals aggression or prosocial behaviors. Initiating and maintaining short periods of eye contact is essential during social interactions that build trust and promote cooperation. How the brain detects and orchestrates social exchanges mediated by eye contact remains an open question in neuroscience. Theories of social neuroscience speculate that the social brain in primates contains neurons specialized to detect and respond to eye-contact. This dissertation reports the discovery and characterization of a class of neurons, located in the amygdala of monkeys, that is activated selectively during eye contact. The discovery of these cells was facilitated by (1) characterization of the response properties of neurons in the amygdala during a canonical image-viewing task and (2) development of a reliable and quantifiable method for eliciting naturalistic eye contact between monkeys in the laboratory setting. The functional role of eye contact cells remains to be determined. The data presented in this dissertation confirm the role of the amygdala in social behaviors and allows for the formulation of new hypotheses about the cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that support complex social interactions among primates.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
eye contact; primate; single unit activity; social neuroscience; Neuroscience; amygdala
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Neuroscience
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gothard, Katalin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNeurons In The Monkey Amygdala Detect Eye Contact During Naturalistic Social Interactionsen_US
dc.creatorMosher, Clayton Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorMosher, Clayton Paulen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEye contact is a fundamental means of social interaction among primates. In both humans and non-human primate societies, eye contact precedes and signals aggression or prosocial behaviors. Initiating and maintaining short periods of eye contact is essential during social interactions that build trust and promote cooperation. How the brain detects and orchestrates social exchanges mediated by eye contact remains an open question in neuroscience. Theories of social neuroscience speculate that the social brain in primates contains neurons specialized to detect and respond to eye-contact. This dissertation reports the discovery and characterization of a class of neurons, located in the amygdala of monkeys, that is activated selectively during eye contact. The discovery of these cells was facilitated by (1) characterization of the response properties of neurons in the amygdala during a canonical image-viewing task and (2) development of a reliable and quantifiable method for eliciting naturalistic eye contact between monkeys in the laboratory setting. The functional role of eye contact cells remains to be determined. The data presented in this dissertation confirm the role of the amygdala in social behaviors and allows for the formulation of new hypotheses about the cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that support complex social interactions among primates.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjecteye contacten_US
dc.subjectprimateen_US
dc.subjectsingle unit activityen_US
dc.subjectsocial neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectamygdalaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGothard, Katalin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGothard, Katalin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuglevand, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZinsmaier, Konrad E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWatkins, Joseph C.en_US
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