Case Study Analysis Of Osseointegration And Limb-Salvaging Technology In Animal Subject's Bilateral Osseointegrated Implant Journey With Potential Human Translation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332675
Title:
Case Study Analysis Of Osseointegration And Limb-Salvaging Technology In Animal Subject's Bilateral Osseointegrated Implant Journey With Potential Human Translation
Author:
Eggert, Donna Marie
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the twenty-first century, new cutting-edge osseointegration technology is improving quality of life. Osseointegration is a new technique to suspend an implant prosthetic device for individuals with a limb-loss. The science of osseointegration is not clearly understood although there appears to be a special relationship between pure titanium that promotes activation of our bone building cells and bone remodeling. Direct bone-anchored osseointegration to integrate a foreign device into the body without the body rejecting the prosthesis is the new technology lacking knowledge and research clinical cases for human translation. The objective of the case study was to review the science of bone-anchored osseointegration as a limb-salvaging technique and potential translation to humans using a canine model in a well-defined control study. Aims were to enhance knowledge technology, improve mobility, decrease pain to improve quality of life and influence health care practices. By the year 2050, the projected number of American amputees is expected to reach 3.6 million. Many people depend on artificial limbs to perform their activities of daily living. Often these limbs start developing complications associated with stump-socket designs such as separation from the human tissue, poor fit with repeated fittings, recurrent skin infections, ulcers and pressure sores due to non-uniform pressure distribution over the socket contact area and pain which decreases their mobility. Since 2001, close to 28,500 American troops have been wounded in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Greater than 24,600 of them have survived their injury, the highest survival rate of any war in the history of the United States. Sadly, 700 of these services members have lost at least one limb from amputations. Lower limb amputations are still performed above the knee as not enough bone can be preserved below the knee for prosthesis. Osseointegration with limb-salvaging techniques could enhance mobility and quality of life for those individuals who sacrifice their limbs defending our freedoms.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
bone-anchored; canine; implants; Limb-salvaging; osseointegration; Nursing; amputees
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reel, Sally

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCase Study Analysis Of Osseointegration And Limb-Salvaging Technology In Animal Subject's Bilateral Osseointegrated Implant Journey With Potential Human Translationen_US
dc.creatorEggert, Donna Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorEggert, Donna Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the twenty-first century, new cutting-edge osseointegration technology is improving quality of life. Osseointegration is a new technique to suspend an implant prosthetic device for individuals with a limb-loss. The science of osseointegration is not clearly understood although there appears to be a special relationship between pure titanium that promotes activation of our bone building cells and bone remodeling. Direct bone-anchored osseointegration to integrate a foreign device into the body without the body rejecting the prosthesis is the new technology lacking knowledge and research clinical cases for human translation. The objective of the case study was to review the science of bone-anchored osseointegration as a limb-salvaging technique and potential translation to humans using a canine model in a well-defined control study. Aims were to enhance knowledge technology, improve mobility, decrease pain to improve quality of life and influence health care practices. By the year 2050, the projected number of American amputees is expected to reach 3.6 million. Many people depend on artificial limbs to perform their activities of daily living. Often these limbs start developing complications associated with stump-socket designs such as separation from the human tissue, poor fit with repeated fittings, recurrent skin infections, ulcers and pressure sores due to non-uniform pressure distribution over the socket contact area and pain which decreases their mobility. Since 2001, close to 28,500 American troops have been wounded in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Greater than 24,600 of them have survived their injury, the highest survival rate of any war in the history of the United States. Sadly, 700 of these services members have lost at least one limb from amputations. Lower limb amputations are still performed above the knee as not enough bone can be preserved below the knee for prosthesis. Osseointegration with limb-salvaging techniques could enhance mobility and quality of life for those individuals who sacrifice their limbs defending our freedoms.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectbone-anchoreden_US
dc.subjectcanineen_US
dc.subjectimplantsen_US
dc.subjectLimb-salvagingen_US
dc.subjectosseointegrationen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectamputeesen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReel, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReel, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbraham, Ivoen_US
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