Understanding the Circumgalactic Medium Through Hydrodynamic Simulations and Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/332661
Title:
Understanding the Circumgalactic Medium Through Hydrodynamic Simulations and Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph
Author:
Ford, Amanda Brady
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
My dissertation focuses on a relatively new field of study: the region immediately around galaxies known as the circumgalactic medium (CGM). The CGM holds vast quantities of mass and metals, yet its connection to galaxies is not well understood. My work uses cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and comparisons to data from Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) to understand the CGM's connection to galaxy evolution, gas accretion, outflows, star formation, and baryon cycling. This includes studies of the CGM's extent and physical conditions; the cause and nature of outflows; gas dynamics, including the first comprehensive study of tracers of inflowing and outflowing gas at low redshift (z=0.25); and direct comparison of theoretical results to observational data. Chapter 1 introduces my research and show its connection to galaxy evolution. Chapter 2 investigates hydrogen and metal line absorption around low-redshift galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. This chapter studies different models for stellar outflows, physical conditions, and dependencies on halo mass. Chapter 3 examines the flow of gas into, out of, and around galaxies using a novel particle tracking technique. This chapter examines the baryon cycle in detail for our preferred model of stellar outflows. Chapter 4 compares our model results, including two separate prescriptions for outflows, with data from COS. We contrast these wind models, showing how they cycle baryons differently, and show degeneracies in observational diagnostics. In Chapter 5, I summarize and discuss plans for future research in this field, and how it can be more fully leveraged to understand galaxy evolution.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cosmic Origins Spectrograph; Galaxy Evolution; Numerical Methods; Quasar Absorption Lines; Simulations; Astronomy; Circumgalactic Medium
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Astronomy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Davé, Romeel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUnderstanding the Circumgalactic Medium Through Hydrodynamic Simulations and Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrographen_US
dc.creatorFord, Amanda Bradyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFord, Amanda Bradyen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation focuses on a relatively new field of study: the region immediately around galaxies known as the circumgalactic medium (CGM). The CGM holds vast quantities of mass and metals, yet its connection to galaxies is not well understood. My work uses cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and comparisons to data from Hubble's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) to understand the CGM's connection to galaxy evolution, gas accretion, outflows, star formation, and baryon cycling. This includes studies of the CGM's extent and physical conditions; the cause and nature of outflows; gas dynamics, including the first comprehensive study of tracers of inflowing and outflowing gas at low redshift (z=0.25); and direct comparison of theoretical results to observational data. Chapter 1 introduces my research and show its connection to galaxy evolution. Chapter 2 investigates hydrogen and metal line absorption around low-redshift galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. This chapter studies different models for stellar outflows, physical conditions, and dependencies on halo mass. Chapter 3 examines the flow of gas into, out of, and around galaxies using a novel particle tracking technique. This chapter examines the baryon cycle in detail for our preferred model of stellar outflows. Chapter 4 compares our model results, including two separate prescriptions for outflows, with data from COS. We contrast these wind models, showing how they cycle baryons differently, and show degeneracies in observational diagnostics. In Chapter 5, I summarize and discuss plans for future research in this field, and how it can be more fully leveraged to understand galaxy evolution.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCosmic Origins Spectrographen_US
dc.subjectGalaxy Evolutionen_US
dc.subjectNumerical Methodsen_US
dc.subjectQuasar Absorption Linesen_US
dc.subjectSimulationsen_US
dc.subjectAstronomyen_US
dc.subjectCircumgalactic Mediumen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDavé, Romeelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavé, Romeelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRieke, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPinto, Philen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalker, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNarayan, Desikaen_US
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