PEPPER: Polarization-Encoding Differential Photometer and Polarimeter

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/325914
Title:
PEPPER: Polarization-Encoding Differential Photometer and Polarimeter
Author:
Ubach, Catarina Coutinho
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
PEPPER is a high-speed differential Polarization-Encoded Photometer and Polarimeter developed in the Center for Astronomical Adaptive Optics at the University of Arizona, Tucson, by Dr. Dan Potter and Matthew Graham. PEPPER is capable of acting as a high-speed polarimeter by using electro-optical switching to chop between standard star and target star, and between in and out-feature bandpass fi lter at frequencies fast enough to suppress atmospheric variations (1). PEPPER is capable of either high-speed polarimetry or di fferential photometry using a combination of simultaneous imaging and electro-optical switching. In the di fferential photometry mode, PEPPER utilizes the electro-optical switching to calibrate instrumental and atmospheric photometric variation. This technique coupled with a zero-read noise photon counting detector achieves photon noise limited results demonstrated to an accuracy of less than 1 part in 10⁵. I will present the design concept behind the photometer and the polarimeter mode of PEPPER, as well as, results from observations in the di fferential photometer mode at the Steward 90 inch telescope, at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Arizona. Results from the analysis of near IR polarimetry observations of young stars with circumstellar disks taken at the Gemini North Telescope with the Hokupa'a adaptive optics system are also presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Report
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chipman, Russell A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePEPPER: Polarization-Encoding Differential Photometer and Polarimeteren_US
dc.creatorUbach, Catarina Coutinhoen_US
dc.contributor.authorUbach, Catarina Coutinhoen_US
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPEPPER is a high-speed differential Polarization-Encoded Photometer and Polarimeter developed in the Center for Astronomical Adaptive Optics at the University of Arizona, Tucson, by Dr. Dan Potter and Matthew Graham. PEPPER is capable of acting as a high-speed polarimeter by using electro-optical switching to chop between standard star and target star, and between in and out-feature bandpass fi lter at frequencies fast enough to suppress atmospheric variations (1). PEPPER is capable of either high-speed polarimetry or di fferential photometry using a combination of simultaneous imaging and electro-optical switching. In the di fferential photometry mode, PEPPER utilizes the electro-optical switching to calibrate instrumental and atmospheric photometric variation. This technique coupled with a zero-read noise photon counting detector achieves photon noise limited results demonstrated to an accuracy of less than 1 part in 10⁵. I will present the design concept behind the photometer and the polarimeter mode of PEPPER, as well as, results from observations in the di fferential photometer mode at the Steward 90 inch telescope, at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Arizona. Results from the analysis of near IR polarimetry observations of young stars with circumstellar disks taken at the Gemini North Telescope with the Hokupa'a adaptive optics system are also presented.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChipman, Russell A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChipman, Russell A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTyo, J. Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
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