Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/325225
Title:
Sign Language: Flannery O'Connor's Pictorial Text
Author:
Reiniche, Ruth Mary
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Flannery O'Connor makes the invisible visible. Just as a speaker of sign language punctuates her narrative with signs that are at once pictures and words, O'Connor punctuates the narratives of her novels with moments or pauses in the forward motion of her text that are somehow framed--in a mirror, or in a window, for example--and that also are at once pictures and words. These pictorial moments not only occur in the reader's present, but because of the way they are stylized, they are simultaneously: open windows into the historical world of the mid-twentieth century; they look backward into the classical past; and they offer a veiled look into the mystery of a Divine reality. Examination of the chronological development and refinement of Flannery O'Connor's pictorial technique by considering the meaning conveyed by the arrangement of figures in a single panel cartoon, the contextual significance found in literary tableaux and filmic montage, the use of the pictorial "camera eye," and the imprinting of tattoo on the human body, presents a new perspective in interpreting her work. Early manifestation of the pictorial technique is evident in O'Connor's college cartoons. When that cartoonist becomes a novelist that tendency for exaggeration is evident in his or her pictorial renditions of characters and situations, as is the case with former cartoonists Faulkner, Updike, West, Cantor, and O'Connor herself. O'Connor does not abandon the power of the pictorial in delivering a message. Instead she embraces it and envelops it in narrative.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Pictorial Text; English; Flannery O'Connor
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Scruggs, Charles W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSign Language: Flannery O'Connor's Pictorial Texten_US
dc.creatorReiniche, Ruth Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorReiniche, Ruth Maryen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFlannery O'Connor makes the invisible visible. Just as a speaker of sign language punctuates her narrative with signs that are at once pictures and words, O'Connor punctuates the narratives of her novels with moments or pauses in the forward motion of her text that are somehow framed--in a mirror, or in a window, for example--and that also are at once pictures and words. These pictorial moments not only occur in the reader's present, but because of the way they are stylized, they are simultaneously: open windows into the historical world of the mid-twentieth century; they look backward into the classical past; and they offer a veiled look into the mystery of a Divine reality. Examination of the chronological development and refinement of Flannery O'Connor's pictorial technique by considering the meaning conveyed by the arrangement of figures in a single panel cartoon, the contextual significance found in literary tableaux and filmic montage, the use of the pictorial "camera eye," and the imprinting of tattoo on the human body, presents a new perspective in interpreting her work. Early manifestation of the pictorial technique is evident in O'Connor's college cartoons. When that cartoonist becomes a novelist that tendency for exaggeration is evident in his or her pictorial renditions of characters and situations, as is the case with former cartoonists Faulkner, Updike, West, Cantor, and O'Connor herself. O'Connor does not abandon the power of the pictorial in delivering a message. Instead she embraces it and envelops it in narrative.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectPictorial Texten_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectFlannery O'Connoren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorScruggs, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScruggs, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDryden, Edgaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTemple, Judyen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.