Efficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Ozone and Trichloromelamine

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/325219
Title:
Efficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Ozone and Trichloromelamine
Author:
Niedfeldt, Emily
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There has been a recent surge in the number of people using reclaimed water systems for personal use. Because of this, it is getting more and more important for easy-to-use and cost effective disinfectants on the market for consumer application. This study looked at the efficacy of three disinfectants, trichloromelamine, ozone and acetic acid, for their ability to reduce the number of waterborne pathogens. Four samples of TCM were tested in a 10mL contaminated water:1mL TCM solution ratio and plated for both total plate counts and to check for generic E.coli. It was found that one of the four samples of TCM (TCM 3) was able to not only give a percent reduction of 92.54%, but it also killed the E.coli that was present in the water. TCM1 had an average percent reduction of 98.77, TCM2's percent reduction was 97.34, and TCM4's: 87.64. This was not the most effective disinfectant, however. Similar tests were done with ozone, ozone that was mixed with brine water, and ozone that was mixed with acetic acid, as well as pure acetic acid. Ozonated brine water, and ozone mixed with acetic acid were both nearly 100% effective at reducing bacterial load in the water samples (99.989 and 100%, respectively). The pure ozone was not nearly as effective, with a percent reduction of 85.7%. These results indicate that TCM and ozone could possibly be effective tools for the consumer to use to disinfect water holding tanks, however, more testing needs to be done in order to find out exactly how effective these products are in the long term, as well as to find the contact time needed for effective kill by TCM.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Animal Sciences; Ozone; Trichloromelamine; Water; Disinfection
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Animal Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marchello, John A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEfficacy of Treating Waterborne Pathogens with the Antimicrobials Ozone and Trichloromelamineen_US
dc.creatorNiedfeldt, Emilyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNiedfeldt, Emilyen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere has been a recent surge in the number of people using reclaimed water systems for personal use. Because of this, it is getting more and more important for easy-to-use and cost effective disinfectants on the market for consumer application. This study looked at the efficacy of three disinfectants, trichloromelamine, ozone and acetic acid, for their ability to reduce the number of waterborne pathogens. Four samples of TCM were tested in a 10mL contaminated water:1mL TCM solution ratio and plated for both total plate counts and to check for generic E.coli. It was found that one of the four samples of TCM (TCM 3) was able to not only give a percent reduction of 92.54%, but it also killed the E.coli that was present in the water. TCM1 had an average percent reduction of 98.77, TCM2's percent reduction was 97.34, and TCM4's: 87.64. This was not the most effective disinfectant, however. Similar tests were done with ozone, ozone that was mixed with brine water, and ozone that was mixed with acetic acid, as well as pure acetic acid. Ozonated brine water, and ozone mixed with acetic acid were both nearly 100% effective at reducing bacterial load in the water samples (99.989 and 100%, respectively). The pure ozone was not nearly as effective, with a percent reduction of 85.7%. These results indicate that TCM and ozone could possibly be effective tools for the consumer to use to disinfect water holding tanks, however, more testing needs to be done in order to find out exactly how effective these products are in the long term, as well as to find the contact time needed for effective kill by TCM.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectAnimal Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectOzoneen_US
dc.subjectTrichloromelamineen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectDisinfectionen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarchello, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarchello, Elaine V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarcia, Samuel R.en_US
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