Love, hatred and indifference in chimpanzees: Personality, Subjective Well-Being, and dyadic-level behavior in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Does something more than rank, age and sex drive the nature of interpersonal relationships in chimpanzees?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/325003
Title:
Love, hatred and indifference in chimpanzees: Personality, Subjective Well-Being, and dyadic-level behavior in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Does something more than rank, age and sex drive the nature of interpersonal relationships in chimpanzees?
Author:
Schneider, Stephanie Michelle Romy
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 01-Jun-2015
Abstract:
This dissertation consists of two studies: the first focuses on reliability of chimpanzee personality and subjective well-being (SWB) scores, the second on validating those scores by comparing them to subjective assessments of behavior in dyads. The first measured reliability of scores of personality and subjective well-being (SWB) across ten years. Dominance rank, and the Dominance and Extraversion Factors significantly correlated between time points. In the second study, I investigated the impact of personality, SWB, and demographic characteristics on individual variation in dyadic-level individual behavior. Age predicted likeability in females, and age and rank predicted likeability in males. Neither personality factors nor SWB were correlated to likeability. An Affable domain scale and an Agonistic domain scale were constructed from the personality items. The Affable domain scale correlated with chimpanzees who were scored high neutral in social interactions, and the agonistic scale correlated with low neutral score in social interactions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
chimpanzee; friendship; personality; social relationships; Subjective Well-Being; Psychology; affiliative and agonistic relationship styles
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, W. Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLove, hatred and indifference in chimpanzees: Personality, Subjective Well-Being, and dyadic-level behavior in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Does something more than rank, age and sex drive the nature of interpersonal relationships in chimpanzees?en_US
dc.creatorSchneider, Stephanie Michelle Romyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Stephanie Michelle Romyen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 01-Jun-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of two studies: the first focuses on reliability of chimpanzee personality and subjective well-being (SWB) scores, the second on validating those scores by comparing them to subjective assessments of behavior in dyads. The first measured reliability of scores of personality and subjective well-being (SWB) across ten years. Dominance rank, and the Dominance and Extraversion Factors significantly correlated between time points. In the second study, I investigated the impact of personality, SWB, and demographic characteristics on individual variation in dyadic-level individual behavior. Age predicted likeability in females, and age and rank predicted likeability in males. Neither personality factors nor SWB were correlated to likeability. An Affable domain scale and an Agonistic domain scale were constructed from the personality items. The Affable domain scale correlated with chimpanzees who were scored high neutral in social interactions, and the agonistic scale correlated with low neutral score in social interactions.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectchimpanzeeen_US
dc.subjectfriendshipen_US
dc.subjectpersonalityen_US
dc.subjectsocial relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectSubjective Well-Beingen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectaffiliative and agonistic relationship stylesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTecot, Stacey R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwartz, Gary E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSteklis, H. Dieteren_US
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