A Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled study of Efficacy and Effectiveness of Pharmacy Quality Improvement

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/323441
Title:
A Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled study of Efficacy and Effectiveness of Pharmacy Quality Improvement
Author:
Chinthammit, Chanadda
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 4-Dec-2014
Abstract:
Background: The Alliance for Patient Medication Safety (APMS) helps community pharmacies comply with continuous quality improvement requirements of many states and third party payment contracts through use of their Pharmacy Quality Commitment (PQC) program. Aims: To assess changes in the incidence of prescription Quality Related Events (QREs) and adoption of patient safety culture attitudes after guided PQC implementation. Methods: Twenty-one pharmacies were randomized to standard PQC practices (control) or guided PQC implementation (treatment). Pharmacy staff completed retrospective pre and post safety culture questionnaires. Negative binomial mixed and linear regression analyses were employed to examine changes in QREs rates and attitudes, respectively. Rasch analysis was used to assess questionnaire validity and reliability. Results: During the 2-month study period 3,343 QREs were reported to the online PQC system. At baseline, no difference in the average QRE reporting rate was identified between groups. Treatment group QRE reporting rates differed in one category post treatment (more incorrect safety caps QREs reported in treatment group, p<0.034). Seventy-one employees completed the questionnaire (70% response). Attitude improvement in the treatment group was 36% greater than in control (p<0.0001). The questionnaire demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity evidence. Conclusions: Guided PQC implementation increased reporting of certain QREs and increased the adoption of patient safety culture attitudes among staff pharmacy.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Medication errors; Patient Safety; Quality improvement; Rasch model; Safety culture; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Community Pharmacy Services / organization & administration
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Warholak, Terri L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled study of Efficacy and Effectiveness of Pharmacy Quality Improvementen_US
dc.creatorChinthammit, Chanaddaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChinthammit, Chanaddaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 4-Dec-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Alliance for Patient Medication Safety (APMS) helps community pharmacies comply with continuous quality improvement requirements of many states and third party payment contracts through use of their Pharmacy Quality Commitment (PQC) program. Aims: To assess changes in the incidence of prescription Quality Related Events (QREs) and adoption of patient safety culture attitudes after guided PQC implementation. Methods: Twenty-one pharmacies were randomized to standard PQC practices (control) or guided PQC implementation (treatment). Pharmacy staff completed retrospective pre and post safety culture questionnaires. Negative binomial mixed and linear regression analyses were employed to examine changes in QREs rates and attitudes, respectively. Rasch analysis was used to assess questionnaire validity and reliability. Results: During the 2-month study period 3,343 QREs were reported to the online PQC system. At baseline, no difference in the average QRE reporting rate was identified between groups. Treatment group QRE reporting rates differed in one category post treatment (more incorrect safety caps QREs reported in treatment group, p<0.034). Seventy-one employees completed the questionnaire (70% response). Attitude improvement in the treatment group was 36% greater than in control (p<0.0001). The questionnaire demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity evidence. Conclusions: Guided PQC implementation increased reporting of certain QREs and increased the adoption of patient safety culture attitudes among staff pharmacy.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectMedication errorsen_US
dc.subjectPatient Safetyen_US
dc.subjectQuality improvementen_US
dc.subjectRasch modelen_US
dc.subjectSafety cultureen_US
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Pharmacy Services / organization & administrationen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWarholak, Terri L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarholak, Terri L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArmstrong, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRupp, Michael T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoe, Deniseen_US
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