The Role of Student Coping in the Socially Shared Regulation of Learning in Small Groups

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/323421
Title:
The Role of Student Coping in the Socially Shared Regulation of Learning in Small Groups
Author:
Vega, Ruby Inez
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
Interaction analyses of challenge episodes were used to investigate the role of student coping behavior in their socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) and emotion during small group activities. Two groups each of third grade and fifth grade students were audio-recorded as they completed three fraction activities during their math class. Initial analysis of group recordings using the Group Behavior Checklist observation system identified points in the group activity were students struggled to complete the task. Next, analyses of group member interactions were completed to (a) determine if challenges were academic or social in nature, (b) identify student challenge management and coping strategies, and (c) determine how these strategies related to group SSRL and academic achievement. Results revealed that the sources of challenge episodes for this sample were academic in nature. However, academic challenges were exacerbated by the social complexities of working with others. Group management and coping strategies that focused members' attention on either negative academic emotions or avoiding negative academic emotions were related to relatively low group academic achievement. Group management strategies that focused students' attention on the task and fostered SSRL behaviors such as joint attention, shared problem-solving, and positive emotion were related to relatively moderate to high group academic achievement. This study demonstrates the necessity of investigating both academic and affective factors when considering students' socially shared regulation of learning during small group activities where the expectation is that students will work collaboratively.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
emotion; small group; SSRL; Educational Psychology; coping
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Role of Student Coping in the Socially Shared Regulation of Learning in Small Groupsen_US
dc.creatorVega, Ruby Inezen_US
dc.contributor.authorVega, Ruby Inezen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractInteraction analyses of challenge episodes were used to investigate the role of student coping behavior in their socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) and emotion during small group activities. Two groups each of third grade and fifth grade students were audio-recorded as they completed three fraction activities during their math class. Initial analysis of group recordings using the Group Behavior Checklist observation system identified points in the group activity were students struggled to complete the task. Next, analyses of group member interactions were completed to (a) determine if challenges were academic or social in nature, (b) identify student challenge management and coping strategies, and (c) determine how these strategies related to group SSRL and academic achievement. Results revealed that the sources of challenge episodes for this sample were academic in nature. However, academic challenges were exacerbated by the social complexities of working with others. Group management and coping strategies that focused members' attention on either negative academic emotions or avoiding negative academic emotions were related to relatively low group academic achievement. Group management strategies that focused students' attention on the task and fostered SSRL behaviors such as joint attention, shared problem-solving, and positive emotion were related to relatively moderate to high group academic achievement. This study demonstrates the necessity of investigating both academic and affective factors when considering students' socially shared regulation of learning during small group activities where the expectation is that students will work collaboratively.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectemotionen_US
dc.subjectsmall groupen_US
dc.subjectSSRLen_US
dc.subjectEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectcopingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarx, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine-Donnerstein, Deboraen_US
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