The influence of personality on dispersal and population dynamics in a passerine bird

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/323420
Title:
The influence of personality on dispersal and population dynamics in a passerine bird
Author:
Aguillon, Stepfanie Maria
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dispersal influences the genetic and social composition of populations, yet it has been difficult to understand the mechanisms underlying dispersal and this limits our ability to understand how dispersal may be influencing population dynamics. Behavioral traits, such as aggression, have been implicated as drivers of both dispersal and population dynamics. However, the influence on both has never been addressed in a single system. Western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) provide an excellent opportunity to address this question, as their dispersal propensity is dependent upon aggressive phenotype and we have detailed observations over a period of more than a decade. I show that natal dispersal is influenced by an interaction between father and son aggressive phenotypes, in addition to available resources on the natal territory. Furthermore, population density is influenced by resource availability and an interaction between population aggression and recruitment of offspring as breeders. Males that breed for multiple seasons once the population has reached saturation recruit a higher proportion of offspring into the population, as do males that are nonaggressive. Males that are nonaggressive are more likely to breed for multiple seasons, which suggests an added cost to aggressive behavior in this species. Both aggressive behavior and the availability of resources are mechanisms influencing dispersal of individuals that manifest at the population scale.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
kin interactions; personality; phenotype-dependent dispersal; population dynamics; recruitment; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; aggression
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Duckworth, Renée A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe influence of personality on dispersal and population dynamics in a passerine birden_US
dc.creatorAguillon, Stepfanie Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAguillon, Stepfanie Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDispersal influences the genetic and social composition of populations, yet it has been difficult to understand the mechanisms underlying dispersal and this limits our ability to understand how dispersal may be influencing population dynamics. Behavioral traits, such as aggression, have been implicated as drivers of both dispersal and population dynamics. However, the influence on both has never been addressed in a single system. Western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) provide an excellent opportunity to address this question, as their dispersal propensity is dependent upon aggressive phenotype and we have detailed observations over a period of more than a decade. I show that natal dispersal is influenced by an interaction between father and son aggressive phenotypes, in addition to available resources on the natal territory. Furthermore, population density is influenced by resource availability and an interaction between population aggression and recruitment of offspring as breeders. Males that breed for multiple seasons once the population has reached saturation recruit a higher proportion of offspring into the population, as do males that are nonaggressive. Males that are nonaggressive are more likely to breed for multiple seasons, which suggests an added cost to aggressive behavior in this species. Both aggressive behavior and the availability of resources are mechanisms influencing dispersal of individuals that manifest at the population scale.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectkin interactionsen_US
dc.subjectpersonalityen_US
dc.subjectphenotype-dependent dispersalen_US
dc.subjectpopulation dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectrecruitmenten_US
dc.subjectEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subjectaggressionen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDuckworth, Renée A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFerriere, Regisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Riper, Charlesen_US
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