Life histories and energetics of bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) colonies and workers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/323419
Title:
Life histories and energetics of bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) colonies and workers
Author:
Cao, Nhi
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 1-Dec-2014
Abstract:
Social insect colonies are complex systems with emergent properties that arise from the cooperation and interaction amongst individuals within colonies. By dividing reproduction and physical labor amongst them, individuals contribute to the growth and ecological success of their colonies, a success that is greater than individuals could achieve on their own. A key characteristic of social insects is a division of labor amongst workers that is determined primarily either by age, morphology, or dominance. Social insects are considered one of the most ecologically successful groups of organisms on earth. Colony life cycles include: 1) growth, in which workers are produced, 2) reproduction, in which queens and males with reproductive capabilities are produced, and 3) senescence. In life history theory, phenotypic plasticity (i.e. a change in phenotype in response to an environmental change), allows organisms to adjust and optimize fitness in response the change in environments. Central to life history theory is the idea that traits have costs and benefits. Using an energetics framework that considers the costs and benefits of traits contributes to our understanding as to why organisms exhibit the sets of traits that they have within their ecological environments. Using the annual bumble bee Bombus impatiens, my dissertation investigates the effects of resource availability on worker production and on the relative allocation of energy towards growth and reproduction within colonies. Bumble bees have a morphological division of labor and concomitantly, they show large intra-colony size variation amongst workers. Because body size is an important life history trait, I also examined the costs and benefits of producing various sized workers. Lastly, I examined the association among worker body size, metabolic rate (a measure of maintenance costs), and lifespan.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Bombus impatiens; bumble bees; life history; resource limitation; trade-offs; Entomology; body size
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Entomology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Davidowitz, Goggy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLife histories and energetics of bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) colonies and workersen_US
dc.creatorCao, Nhien_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Nhien_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 1-Dec-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractSocial insect colonies are complex systems with emergent properties that arise from the cooperation and interaction amongst individuals within colonies. By dividing reproduction and physical labor amongst them, individuals contribute to the growth and ecological success of their colonies, a success that is greater than individuals could achieve on their own. A key characteristic of social insects is a division of labor amongst workers that is determined primarily either by age, morphology, or dominance. Social insects are considered one of the most ecologically successful groups of organisms on earth. Colony life cycles include: 1) growth, in which workers are produced, 2) reproduction, in which queens and males with reproductive capabilities are produced, and 3) senescence. In life history theory, phenotypic plasticity (i.e. a change in phenotype in response to an environmental change), allows organisms to adjust and optimize fitness in response the change in environments. Central to life history theory is the idea that traits have costs and benefits. Using an energetics framework that considers the costs and benefits of traits contributes to our understanding as to why organisms exhibit the sets of traits that they have within their ecological environments. Using the annual bumble bee Bombus impatiens, my dissertation investigates the effects of resource availability on worker production and on the relative allocation of energy towards growth and reproduction within colonies. Bumble bees have a morphological division of labor and concomitantly, they show large intra-colony size variation amongst workers. Because body size is an important life history trait, I also examined the costs and benefits of producing various sized workers. Lastly, I examined the association among worker body size, metabolic rate (a measure of maintenance costs), and lifespan.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectBombus impatiensen_US
dc.subjectbumble beesen_US
dc.subjectlife historyen_US
dc.subjectresource limitationen_US
dc.subjecttrade-offsen_US
dc.subjectEntomologyen_US
dc.subjectbody sizeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDavidowitz, Goggyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavidowitz, Goggyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGronenberg, Wulfilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWheeler, Dianaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPapaj, Danen_US
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