Evaluating Residual Feed Intake in Replacement Heifer Calves for Correlation with Breed and Sire

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/323227
Title:
Evaluating Residual Feed Intake in Replacement Heifer Calves for Correlation with Breed and Sire
Author:
Wright, Ashley Diane
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With feed costs representing on average 65% of the total cost of production improvements in feed efficiency could have a major impact on the beef industry. Postweaning performance and feed efficiency data were collected on 114 heifers born on the University of Arizona's V bar V Ranch. Residual feed intake (RFI) was significantly correlated with dry matter intake (DMI) (r = 0.46) and G:F (r = -0.43), while G:F was moderately correlated with initial age (r = -0.54), initial body weight (r = -0.40), and average daily gain (ADG) (r = 0.68). Residual gain (RG) was moderately correlated with RFI (r = -0.41) and highly correlated with ADG (0.62) and G:F (0.73). In addition, RG was significantly correlated (r = -0.21) with initial weight suggesting that selection for RG could lead to increased cow mature size. Heifers were sorted into three breed categories: Hereford, Hereford cross, and Wagyu cross and breed effect on performance and feed efficiency traits were analyzed. Significant differences in DMI, FCR, and RG were noted, but likely due to significant differences in age at the time of testing. RFI was not significantly different between breed groups, suggesting that RFI is less influenced by animal age than other measures of feed efficiency. In addition, sires of study heifers with 5 or more progeny were selected and progeny performance and feed efficiency traits were compared between sires. No significant differences in ADG, RFI, FCR, or RG were noted between sire progeny. This was likely due to an insufficient number of progeny used in the trial. Further research and an increased number of animals used may uncover significant impacts of sire on RFI.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Feed Efficiency; Heifer; Residual Feed Intake; Animal Sciences; Beef Cattle
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Animal Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Faulkner, Dan B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEvaluating Residual Feed Intake in Replacement Heifer Calves for Correlation with Breed and Sireen_US
dc.creatorWright, Ashley Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Ashley Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith feed costs representing on average 65% of the total cost of production improvements in feed efficiency could have a major impact on the beef industry. Postweaning performance and feed efficiency data were collected on 114 heifers born on the University of Arizona's V bar V Ranch. Residual feed intake (RFI) was significantly correlated with dry matter intake (DMI) (r = 0.46) and G:F (r = -0.43), while G:F was moderately correlated with initial age (r = -0.54), initial body weight (r = -0.40), and average daily gain (ADG) (r = 0.68). Residual gain (RG) was moderately correlated with RFI (r = -0.41) and highly correlated with ADG (0.62) and G:F (0.73). In addition, RG was significantly correlated (r = -0.21) with initial weight suggesting that selection for RG could lead to increased cow mature size. Heifers were sorted into three breed categories: Hereford, Hereford cross, and Wagyu cross and breed effect on performance and feed efficiency traits were analyzed. Significant differences in DMI, FCR, and RG were noted, but likely due to significant differences in age at the time of testing. RFI was not significantly different between breed groups, suggesting that RFI is less influenced by animal age than other measures of feed efficiency. In addition, sires of study heifers with 5 or more progeny were selected and progeny performance and feed efficiency traits were compared between sires. No significant differences in ADG, RFI, FCR, or RG were noted between sire progeny. This was likely due to an insufficient number of progeny used in the trial. Further research and an increased number of animals used may uncover significant impacts of sire on RFI.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectFeed Efficiencyen_US
dc.subjectHeiferen_US
dc.subjectResidual Feed Intakeen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBeef Cattleen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFaulkner, Dan B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson-Sanders, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchafer, Daveen_US
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