The Effect of Music on Impulsivity in College Undergraduate Students with Attention Deficits

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/322986
Title:
The Effect of Music on Impulsivity in College Undergraduate Students with Attention Deficits
Author:
Dunbar, Laura L.
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of music listening on impulsivity as judged by the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT) II v. 5. College undergraduate students were recruited into one of two groups and were administered a computer task (CPT) to complete in an initial condition, a music condition, and a silence condition. One group of participants had no diagnosed history of ADHD while the other participant group had a history of ADHD. The initial condition served as an opportunity for each participant to take the CPT with the researcher present to allow each participant to ask questions before taking the test alone; each participant was then taken to a separate testing room. As all participants were tested in all three conditions, the remaining two (music and silence) were randomly assigned to control for order effect. The music condition involved taking the CPT alone in the testing room with "In a Mello Tone" by Count Basie playing in the background during the test administration. The piece was manipulated to have a tempo of mm = 124 and looped to last the entirety of the CPT (14 minutes). Each participant was administered the CPT in a silence condition, in which the participant was alone in the testing room without other provided stimuli. The final sample was N = 51 with n = 26 enrolled in the typical group and n = 25 enrolled in the group with attention deficits. A significant main effect difference was found by group: the typical group exhibited lower impulsivity levels as compared to the ADHD group based on Commission mean scores. Additionally, significant main effect differences were found by condition (initial, music, and silence). Both the factors of group and condition appear to be independent as no interaction was found. Implications and suggestions for future research were discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
attention deficits; background music; impulsivity; Music; ADHD
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hamann, Donald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Effect of Music on Impulsivity in College Undergraduate Students with Attention Deficitsen_US
dc.creatorDunbar, Laura L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDunbar, Laura L.en_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of music listening on impulsivity as judged by the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT) II v. 5. College undergraduate students were recruited into one of two groups and were administered a computer task (CPT) to complete in an initial condition, a music condition, and a silence condition. One group of participants had no diagnosed history of ADHD while the other participant group had a history of ADHD. The initial condition served as an opportunity for each participant to take the CPT with the researcher present to allow each participant to ask questions before taking the test alone; each participant was then taken to a separate testing room. As all participants were tested in all three conditions, the remaining two (music and silence) were randomly assigned to control for order effect. The music condition involved taking the CPT alone in the testing room with "In a Mello Tone" by Count Basie playing in the background during the test administration. The piece was manipulated to have a tempo of mm = 124 and looped to last the entirety of the CPT (14 minutes). Each participant was administered the CPT in a silence condition, in which the participant was alone in the testing room without other provided stimuli. The final sample was N = 51 with n = 26 enrolled in the typical group and n = 25 enrolled in the group with attention deficits. A significant main effect difference was found by group: the typical group exhibited lower impulsivity levels as compared to the ADHD group based on Commission mean scores. Additionally, significant main effect differences were found by condition (initial, music, and silence). Both the factors of group and condition appear to be independent as no interaction was found. Implications and suggestions for future research were discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectattention deficitsen_US
dc.subjectbackground musicen_US
dc.subjectimpulsivityen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectADHDen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHamann, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Shellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDraves, Tami J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine-Donnerstein, Deboraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamann, Donalden_US
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