From Migrant Farmworkers to First-Generation Latina/o Students: Factors Predicting College Outcomes in Students Participating in the College Assistance Migrant Program

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/322983
Title:
From Migrant Farmworkers to First-Generation Latina/o Students: Factors Predicting College Outcomes in Students Participating in the College Assistance Migrant Program
Author:
Mendez, Julian Jesus
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
This dissertation examines factors that are associated with college outcomes (i.e., college GPA, persistence, and academic probation) for a migrant Latina/o college student population participating in the federally funded College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). The study also examines the impact of CAMP services on college outcomes and socio-cognitive perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). Further, the study compared participant's level of involvement in the CAMP program across universities and qualitatively examined students' open-ended responses on how the CAMP program is useful and how it can be improved. Participants were 245 CAMP participants from four universities including: Northeastern University, Central State University, Pacific Northwest University, and Southwestern University. High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA. Living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP's personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Higher levels of academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and CAMP's academic and financial assistance predicted being less likely to obtain academic probation status. Student's open ended responses revealed CAMP services helped students to: integrate socially into the university system, become more resilient when facing academic, personal, and cultural barriers, navigate the higher education landscape, and provided students with financial assistance. However, students also reported that the program could be improved. Implications for practice are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
College; Migrant; Retention; Educational Psychology; CAMP
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bauman, Sheri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFrom Migrant Farmworkers to First-Generation Latina/o Students: Factors Predicting College Outcomes in Students Participating in the College Assistance Migrant Programen_US
dc.creatorMendez, Julian Jesusen_US
dc.contributor.authorMendez, Julian Jesusen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines factors that are associated with college outcomes (i.e., college GPA, persistence, and academic probation) for a migrant Latina/o college student population participating in the federally funded College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). The study also examines the impact of CAMP services on college outcomes and socio-cognitive perceptions (i.e., college academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and school connectedness). Further, the study compared participant's level of involvement in the CAMP program across universities and qualitatively examined students' open-ended responses on how the CAMP program is useful and how it can be improved. Participants were 245 CAMP participants from four universities including: Northeastern University, Central State University, Pacific Northwest University, and Southwestern University. High school achievement and academic resilience were significant positive predictors of college GPA. Living on-campus was a negative predictor. Financial aid in the form of loans, having family responsibilities, and working full-time off campus were negative predictors of persistence, while involvement in CAMP's personal and academic counseling services was a positive predictor. Higher levels of academic self-efficacy, academic resilience, and CAMP's academic and financial assistance predicted being less likely to obtain academic probation status. Student's open ended responses revealed CAMP services helped students to: integrate socially into the university system, become more resilient when facing academic, personal, and cultural barriers, navigate the higher education landscape, and provided students with financial assistance. However, students also reported that the program could be improved. Implications for practice are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCollegeen_US
dc.subjectMigranten_US
dc.subjectRetentionen_US
dc.subjectEducational Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectCAMPen_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBauman, Sherien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGood, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLopez, Francescaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBauman, Sherien_US
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