Depression, Fatigue, Declines in Cognitive Function and Uncertainty in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/321610
Title:
Depression, Fatigue, Declines in Cognitive Function and Uncertainty in Women with Multiple Sclerosis
Author:
Gray, Cheri Lynn
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among common signs/symptoms (depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function) in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) using a modified version of Braden's Self Help Theoretical Model and evaluate whether depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function and uncertainty, enabling skills (self-control in this study) and self-management (coping in this study) influence quality of life outcomes in women with MS. MS is one of the most common causes of disability among young adults and is the most prevalent neurological disease among young and middle-aged adults in certain parts of the world. Although research had previously been undertaken with regards to the common symptoms of MS, uncertainty, enabling skills, self-management and quality of life, there had been no studies undertaken that involved all of them. This descriptive study was the first to explore relationships among common symptoms of MS, uncertainty, enabling skills, self-management and quality of life in an MS population using Braden's Learned Response Chronic Illness Self Help Model. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with 106 participants. Measurement tools utilized in the study included: 1) Demographic and Illness Characteristics, 2) The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 3) Perceived Deficits Questionnaire, 4) Patient Health Questionnaire-9, 5) Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Scale- Adult, 6) Rosenbaum's Self-Control Scale- Modified, 7) COPE Inventory-Brief, and 8) SF-36 Health Status Questionnaire. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, correlations and linear regression to answer the specific aims. The study findings indicate that relationships exist among depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function, uncertainty, enabling skills and self-management in women with MS. The study findings also indicate that depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function, uncertainty, enabling skills and self-management influence quality of life outcomes in women with MS. Finally, while only a first study, the research findings indicate using a modified version of Braden's Learned Response Chronic Illness Self Help Model (LRCISHM) is appropriate in a population of women with MS. Future research involving women with MS who meet the inclusion criteria across the contiguous United States as well as male military veterans with MS is recommended. Research involving this modified version of Braden's LRCISHM as well as research incorporating disability levels is recommended. Research to develop interventions to improve quality of life outcomes and minimize distress is also recommended.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cognitive Decline; Depression; Fatigue; Multiple Sclerosis; Uncertainty; Nursing; Braden
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Badger, Terry
Committee Chair:
Badger, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDepression, Fatigue, Declines in Cognitive Function and Uncertainty in Women with Multiple Sclerosisen_US
dc.creatorGray, Cheri Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorGray, Cheri Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among common signs/symptoms (depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function) in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) using a modified version of Braden's Self Help Theoretical Model and evaluate whether depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function and uncertainty, enabling skills (self-control in this study) and self-management (coping in this study) influence quality of life outcomes in women with MS. MS is one of the most common causes of disability among young adults and is the most prevalent neurological disease among young and middle-aged adults in certain parts of the world. Although research had previously been undertaken with regards to the common symptoms of MS, uncertainty, enabling skills, self-management and quality of life, there had been no studies undertaken that involved all of them. This descriptive study was the first to explore relationships among common symptoms of MS, uncertainty, enabling skills, self-management and quality of life in an MS population using Braden's Learned Response Chronic Illness Self Help Model. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with 106 participants. Measurement tools utilized in the study included: 1) Demographic and Illness Characteristics, 2) The Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 3) Perceived Deficits Questionnaire, 4) Patient Health Questionnaire-9, 5) Mishel's Uncertainty in Illness Scale- Adult, 6) Rosenbaum's Self-Control Scale- Modified, 7) COPE Inventory-Brief, and 8) SF-36 Health Status Questionnaire. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, correlations and linear regression to answer the specific aims. The study findings indicate that relationships exist among depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function, uncertainty, enabling skills and self-management in women with MS. The study findings also indicate that depression, fatigue, declines in cognitive function, uncertainty, enabling skills and self-management influence quality of life outcomes in women with MS. Finally, while only a first study, the research findings indicate using a modified version of Braden's Learned Response Chronic Illness Self Help Model (LRCISHM) is appropriate in a population of women with MS. Future research involving women with MS who meet the inclusion criteria across the contiguous United States as well as male military veterans with MS is recommended. Research involving this modified version of Braden's LRCISHM as well as research incorporating disability levels is recommended. Research to develop interventions to improve quality of life outcomes and minimize distress is also recommended.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCognitive Declineen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectFatigueen_US
dc.subjectMultiple Sclerosisen_US
dc.subjectUncertaintyen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectBradenen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBadger, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.chairBadger, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
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