Hidden Hunger: A Political Ecology of Food and Nutrition in the Kumaon Hills

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/321600
Title:
Hidden Hunger: A Political Ecology of Food and Nutrition in the Kumaon Hills
Author:
Nichols, Carly Ellen
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recently, India has come under increasing scrutiny for its failure to improve food and nutrition security (FNS). Prominent governmental and nongovernmental development strategies addressing FNS include promoting horticultural crops to increase incomes, distributing food, and providing nutritional education. These programs, however, have seen mixed results. Analyzing qualitative data collected in the summer of 2013, this paper examines programs in Uttarakhand, India where hunger has been eradicated, yet malnutrition persists. I suggest that the intersection of horticultural development with existing gendered labor practices helps explain why malnutrition remains a problem despite high program functionality. Specifically, I find that inequitable gendered labor burdens are largely responsible for poor eating practices and lowered nutritional levels. I argue that interventions to improve FNS reinscribe and legitimize these burdens by promulgating a discourse situating the problem with women, whose lack of education or poor time management is seen as the source of the problem. Additionally, I find that horticultural development leads to increased reliance on market-based foods, which villagers find less nutritious. Following Mansfield (2011) I employ the concept of food as a “vector of intercorporeality” (Stassart and Whatmore 2003:449) to unpack why health perceptions are entwined in shifting landscapes of agricultural production and food consumption. I bring this conceptualization into conversation with the notion of social reproduction, investigating the human and nonhuman bodies that produce economic, ecological, and health outcomes. I argue that who, or what, these bodies are and the relations in which they are entangled matter to both material and social concerns.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Feminist theory; Food and Nutrition Security; Health; India; Social reproduction; Geography; Agriculture
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Del Casino, Vincent

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHidden Hunger: A Political Ecology of Food and Nutrition in the Kumaon Hillsen_US
dc.creatorNichols, Carly Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Carly Ellenen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently, India has come under increasing scrutiny for its failure to improve food and nutrition security (FNS). Prominent governmental and nongovernmental development strategies addressing FNS include promoting horticultural crops to increase incomes, distributing food, and providing nutritional education. These programs, however, have seen mixed results. Analyzing qualitative data collected in the summer of 2013, this paper examines programs in Uttarakhand, India where hunger has been eradicated, yet malnutrition persists. I suggest that the intersection of horticultural development with existing gendered labor practices helps explain why malnutrition remains a problem despite high program functionality. Specifically, I find that inequitable gendered labor burdens are largely responsible for poor eating practices and lowered nutritional levels. I argue that interventions to improve FNS reinscribe and legitimize these burdens by promulgating a discourse situating the problem with women, whose lack of education or poor time management is seen as the source of the problem. Additionally, I find that horticultural development leads to increased reliance on market-based foods, which villagers find less nutritious. Following Mansfield (2011) I employ the concept of food as a “vector of intercorporeality” (Stassart and Whatmore 2003:449) to unpack why health perceptions are entwined in shifting landscapes of agricultural production and food consumption. I bring this conceptualization into conversation with the notion of social reproduction, investigating the human and nonhuman bodies that produce economic, ecological, and health outcomes. I argue that who, or what, these bodies are and the relations in which they are entangled matter to both material and social concerns.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectFeminist theoryen_US
dc.subjectFood and Nutrition Securityen_US
dc.subjectHealthen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.subjectSocial reproductionen_US
dc.subjectGeographyen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDel Casino, Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDel Casino, Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOsborne, Traceyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoshi, Sapanaen_US
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