Perceptions of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome among African American Women Living in SPA 6 of Los Angeles County

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/321519
Title:
Perceptions of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome among African American Women Living in SPA 6 of Los Angeles County
Author:
Harris-Mims, Jameelah
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is a serious public health issue in this country and a major contributor to infant mortality in African American populations. African Americans have one of the highest rates of SIDS, some of which is due to increased risk factors for SIDS, such as prone sleeping and bed-sharing, as well as a lack of adherence to the SIDS risk reducing recommendations. Little is understood about this lack of adherence in the African American population or how to effectively address it but some research suggests a link between parental health beliefs of SIDS and the risk reducing recommendations and the implementation of these recommendations. This study used quantitative methods to gather data about the health beliefs and perceptions of SIDS among African American women living in Service Planning Area (SPA) Six of Los Angeles County to better understand the link between beliefs about SIDS and how this relates to implementation of the safe infant sleeping recommendations, specifically bed-sharing and prone sleeping. A self-administered questionnaire was developed to collect data using the Health Belief Model and several of its concepts as a guiding framework to assist with the construction of the questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed electronically through the survey software program, Survey Monkey and analyzed using statistical software, SPSS. Exploratory factor analysis found the questionnaire reliable and valid upon the removal of four items, including the construct of cues to action. The new 19-item questionnaire suggested that the women felt that SIDS was a big problem but didn't feel as susceptible. There was also a clear confusion about prone sleeping position. Overall, the data suggests a need for tailored educational campaigns in African American communities to increase awareness of and susceptibility to SIDS and stressing the benefits of supine sleeping position.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Health Belief Model; Sudden Infant Death Syndrome; Nursing; Crib death
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Archbold, Kristen H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePerceptions of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome among African American Women Living in SPA 6 of Los Angeles Countyen_US
dc.creatorHarris-Mims, Jameelahen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris-Mims, Jameelahen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is a serious public health issue in this country and a major contributor to infant mortality in African American populations. African Americans have one of the highest rates of SIDS, some of which is due to increased risk factors for SIDS, such as prone sleeping and bed-sharing, as well as a lack of adherence to the SIDS risk reducing recommendations. Little is understood about this lack of adherence in the African American population or how to effectively address it but some research suggests a link between parental health beliefs of SIDS and the risk reducing recommendations and the implementation of these recommendations. This study used quantitative methods to gather data about the health beliefs and perceptions of SIDS among African American women living in Service Planning Area (SPA) Six of Los Angeles County to better understand the link between beliefs about SIDS and how this relates to implementation of the safe infant sleeping recommendations, specifically bed-sharing and prone sleeping. A self-administered questionnaire was developed to collect data using the Health Belief Model and several of its concepts as a guiding framework to assist with the construction of the questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed electronically through the survey software program, Survey Monkey and analyzed using statistical software, SPSS. Exploratory factor analysis found the questionnaire reliable and valid upon the removal of four items, including the construct of cues to action. The new 19-item questionnaire suggested that the women felt that SIDS was a big problem but didn't feel as susceptible. There was also a clear confusion about prone sleeping position. Overall, the data suggests a need for tailored educational campaigns in African American communities to increase awareness of and susceptibility to SIDS and stressing the benefits of supine sleeping position.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectHealth Belief Modelen_US
dc.subjectSudden Infant Death Syndromeen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectCrib deathen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArchbold, Kristen H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArchbold, Kristen H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLoescher, Lois J.en_US
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