Toward Determining the Role of PKA in Controlling TORC2 Function and Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium Discoideum

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/321370
Title:
Toward Determining the Role of PKA in Controlling TORC2 Function and Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium Discoideum
Author:
Petlick, Alexandra Ruth
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 1-May-2016
Abstract:
Chemotaxis is a process whereby single- and multi-cellular organisms migrate in response to external chemical stimuli. This directed cell movement is regulated by complex signaling pathways and is implicated in embryonic development, immune response, and the metastasis of cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum, social amoebae with the ability to migrate and aggregate in response to chemoattractants such as cAMP, have been used as a model system to study chemotaxis. Preliminary research suggests that protein kinase (PKA) is involved in some of the signaling pathways that regulate chemotaxis. The role of PKA in chemotaxis was investigated, first, by characterizing the phenotype of PKA null cells using established cell biological and biochemical assays. Furthermore, spatiotemporal regulation of critical cytoskeletal proteins was probed in wild-type and PKA null cells using confocal fluorescence microscopy, indicating misregulation of both F-actin and Myosin II in pkaC- and pkaR- cells. Finally, preliminary work was done to lay the groundwork for experiments exploring possible PKA targets mediating TORC2 function in chemotaxis.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Chemotaxis; confocal microscopy; Dictyostelium; Myosin; TORC2; Chemistry; Actin
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Charest, Pascale G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleToward Determining the Role of PKA in Controlling TORC2 Function and Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium Discoideumen_US
dc.creatorPetlick, Alexandra Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorPetlick, Alexandra Ruthen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 1-May-2016en_US
dc.description.abstractChemotaxis is a process whereby single- and multi-cellular organisms migrate in response to external chemical stimuli. This directed cell movement is regulated by complex signaling pathways and is implicated in embryonic development, immune response, and the metastasis of cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum, social amoebae with the ability to migrate and aggregate in response to chemoattractants such as cAMP, have been used as a model system to study chemotaxis. Preliminary research suggests that protein kinase (PKA) is involved in some of the signaling pathways that regulate chemotaxis. The role of PKA in chemotaxis was investigated, first, by characterizing the phenotype of PKA null cells using established cell biological and biochemical assays. Furthermore, spatiotemporal regulation of critical cytoskeletal proteins was probed in wild-type and PKA null cells using confocal fluorescence microscopy, indicating misregulation of both F-actin and Myosin II in pkaC- and pkaR- cells. Finally, preliminary work was done to lay the groundwork for experiments exploring possible PKA targets mediating TORC2 function in chemotaxis.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectChemotaxisen_US
dc.subjectconfocal microscopyen_US
dc.subjectDictyosteliumen_US
dc.subjectMyosinen_US
dc.subjectTORC2en_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectActinen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCharest, Pascale G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAspinwall, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeien, Michaelen_US
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