From Growth to Electronic Structure of Dipolar Organic Semiconductors on Coinage Metal Surfaces

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/321297
Title:
From Growth to Electronic Structure of Dipolar Organic Semiconductors on Coinage Metal Surfaces
Author:
Ilyas, Nahid
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this thesis, I present a comprehensive study of the interfacial electronic structure and thin film growth of two types of dipolar organic semiconductors on noble metals by employing a surface science approach, which underlines the critical role of surface electronic states in determining the interfacial electronic structure and self-assembly of organic semiconductors. I show that the electronic structure at organic/metal interfaces is complex and depends on important factors such as molecular adsorption configuration, surface/molecule coupling strength, reactivity of the substrate, molecular electrostatics, and local film structure. I demonstrate the fundamental capability of the image potential states and resonances in probing the local film environment, especially in systems consisting of inhomogeneous film structure. I also show that the presence of adsorbates on a surface allows one to investigate quantum mechanical interference effects otherwise not accessible on the bare surface. The dipolar organic semiconductors studied here are vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) and chloroboron-subphthalocyanine (ClB-SubPc). The single crystals of gold and copper with hexagonal surface symmetry (111) were used to investigate the interfacial properties of VONc and ClB-SubPc, respectively. The fundamental understanding of self-assembly of large π-conjugated organic semiconductors on metals is a crucial step in controlling fabrication of supramolecular structures. Here, I provide a first step in this direction with a detailed and quantitative analysis of molecular nearest-neighbor distances that unravels the fundamental intermolecular interactions of organic semiconductors on transition metal surfaces. I additionally investigated the interfacial electronic structure of these organic semiconductors to examine the relation between molecular adsorption orientation and charge transfer across the interface.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Intermolecular Interactions; Organic Interfaces; Organic Semiconductors; Scanning Tunneling Microscopy; Two-Photon Photoemission; Chemistry
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Monti, Oliver L. A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFrom Growth to Electronic Structure of Dipolar Organic Semiconductors on Coinage Metal Surfacesen_US
dc.creatorIlyas, Nahiden_US
dc.contributor.authorIlyas, Nahiden_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I present a comprehensive study of the interfacial electronic structure and thin film growth of two types of dipolar organic semiconductors on noble metals by employing a surface science approach, which underlines the critical role of surface electronic states in determining the interfacial electronic structure and self-assembly of organic semiconductors. I show that the electronic structure at organic/metal interfaces is complex and depends on important factors such as molecular adsorption configuration, surface/molecule coupling strength, reactivity of the substrate, molecular electrostatics, and local film structure. I demonstrate the fundamental capability of the image potential states and resonances in probing the local film environment, especially in systems consisting of inhomogeneous film structure. I also show that the presence of adsorbates on a surface allows one to investigate quantum mechanical interference effects otherwise not accessible on the bare surface. The dipolar organic semiconductors studied here are vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) and chloroboron-subphthalocyanine (ClB-SubPc). The single crystals of gold and copper with hexagonal surface symmetry (111) were used to investigate the interfacial properties of VONc and ClB-SubPc, respectively. The fundamental understanding of self-assembly of large π-conjugated organic semiconductors on metals is a crucial step in controlling fabrication of supramolecular structures. Here, I provide a first step in this direction with a detailed and quantitative analysis of molecular nearest-neighbor distances that unravels the fundamental intermolecular interactions of organic semiconductors on transition metal surfaces. I additionally investigated the interfacial electronic structure of these organic semiconductors to examine the relation between molecular adsorption orientation and charge transfer across the interface.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectIntermolecular Interactionsen_US
dc.subjectOrganic Interfacesen_US
dc.subjectOrganic Semiconductorsen_US
dc.subjectScanning Tunneling Microscopyen_US
dc.subjectTwo-Photon Photoemissionen_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMonti, Oliver L. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMonti, Oliver L. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaavedra, S. Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPyun, Dong-Chul (Jeffrey)en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuxter, Vanessaen_US
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