Self-Efficacy in Music Education Vocal Instruction: A Collective Case Study of Four Undergraduate Vocal Music Education Majors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/320010
Title:
Self-Efficacy in Music Education Vocal Instruction: A Collective Case Study of Four Undergraduate Vocal Music Education Majors
Author:
Royo, Johanna Lucia
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While much research exists on self-efficacy in music programs, few research studies have qualitatively examined the impact of vocal performance settings on music education majors' self-efficacies and career goals. This collective case study examines the self-efficacy perceptions of four undergraduate vocal music education students in five vocal performance and rehearsal settings: (a) voice lessons, (b) studio classes, (c) choral rehearsals, (d) choral performances, and (e) juries. During a spring semester at a major university in the southwestern United States, I examined how participants' perceptions of their family backgrounds, career goals, lifestyles, peers, and student-teacher relationships influenced their vocal self-efficacy perceptions and music career goals. Data collection included observations, individual interviews with participants, and one focus group interview. Coding methods were used to analyze the interview transcripts and observation field notes. Triangulation, peer review, and member checks of transcriptions were used to ensure accuracy. Findings are documented case-by-case and as cross-case themes. I found that mastery experiences and family support during adolescence influenced participants' initial decisions to major in music but had little influence on vocal self-efficacy during the study. Secondly, self-efficacy changes noted throughout the study influenced participants' career goals. Other emergent themes included the role of memory, teacher feedback, concept comprehension and socialization. I conclude with cross-case themes and offer ideas for future self-efficacy research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
self-efficacy; teacher feedback; vocal instruction; Music; career goals
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Draves, Tami J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy in Music Education Vocal Instruction: A Collective Case Study of Four Undergraduate Vocal Music Education Majorsen_US
dc.creatorRoyo, Johanna Luciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoyo, Johanna Luciaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile much research exists on self-efficacy in music programs, few research studies have qualitatively examined the impact of vocal performance settings on music education majors' self-efficacies and career goals. This collective case study examines the self-efficacy perceptions of four undergraduate vocal music education students in five vocal performance and rehearsal settings: (a) voice lessons, (b) studio classes, (c) choral rehearsals, (d) choral performances, and (e) juries. During a spring semester at a major university in the southwestern United States, I examined how participants' perceptions of their family backgrounds, career goals, lifestyles, peers, and student-teacher relationships influenced their vocal self-efficacy perceptions and music career goals. Data collection included observations, individual interviews with participants, and one focus group interview. Coding methods were used to analyze the interview transcripts and observation field notes. Triangulation, peer review, and member checks of transcriptions were used to ensure accuracy. Findings are documented case-by-case and as cross-case themes. I found that mastery experiences and family support during adolescence influenced participants' initial decisions to major in music but had little influence on vocal self-efficacy during the study. Secondly, self-efficacy changes noted throughout the study influenced participants' career goals. Other emergent themes included the role of memory, teacher feedback, concept comprehension and socialization. I conclude with cross-case themes and offer ideas for future self-efficacy research.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectteacher feedbacken_US
dc.subjectvocal instructionen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectcareer goalsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDraves, Tami J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDraves, Tami J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Shellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamann, Donalden_US
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