Getting Used to Home: The Social and Educational Experiences of Puerto Rican Transnational Youth

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/319984
Title:
Getting Used to Home: The Social and Educational Experiences of Puerto Rican Transnational Youth
Author:
Soto-Santiago, Sandra L.
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation research showcases six ethnographic case studies that focus on the experiences of Puerto Rican transnational youths and their families upon returning from the US to Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is a remarkable setting to study transnationalism because of its particular historical and sociopolitical relationship with the US, which grants Puerto Ricans citizenship and thus ease of movement, while retaining a strong attachment to the Island. It can be argued that Puerto Ricans define transnationalism, being simultaneously insiders and outsiders to the US national scene. The youths involved in these dynamics learn to navigate different educational and social settings on the Island and the US. Factors like language and the educational contexts are highly influential in the students' lives and their educational outcomes. The study was conducted over a period of seven months in two public schools in Puerto Rico. The data were collected through interviews, classroom observations, and home visits with return migrant students, their parents, and their teachers and school staff. The combination of these data collection methods and the variety of participants, provided a nuanced portrayal of the nature of their transnationalism and the social and educational experiences of the families in and out of the school context.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Migration; Public education; Puerto Rican youth; Schooling experiences; Transnationalism and education; Language, Reading & Culture; Emotional attachment
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Moll, Luis C.
Committee Chair:
Moll, Luis C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleGetting Used to Home: The Social and Educational Experiences of Puerto Rican Transnational Youthen_US
dc.creatorSoto-Santiago, Sandra L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSoto-Santiago, Sandra L.en_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation research showcases six ethnographic case studies that focus on the experiences of Puerto Rican transnational youths and their families upon returning from the US to Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is a remarkable setting to study transnationalism because of its particular historical and sociopolitical relationship with the US, which grants Puerto Ricans citizenship and thus ease of movement, while retaining a strong attachment to the Island. It can be argued that Puerto Ricans define transnationalism, being simultaneously insiders and outsiders to the US national scene. The youths involved in these dynamics learn to navigate different educational and social settings on the Island and the US. Factors like language and the educational contexts are highly influential in the students' lives and their educational outcomes. The study was conducted over a period of seven months in two public schools in Puerto Rico. The data were collected through interviews, classroom observations, and home visits with return migrant students, their parents, and their teachers and school staff. The combination of these data collection methods and the variety of participants, provided a nuanced portrayal of the nature of their transnationalism and the social and educational experiences of the families in and out of the school context.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectPublic educationen_US
dc.subjectPuerto Rican youthen_US
dc.subjectSchooling experiencesen_US
dc.subjectTransnationalism and educationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
dc.subjectEmotional attachmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzález, Norma E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen_US
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