Teaching Undergraduate Creative Nonfiction Writing: A Rhetorical Enterprise

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/319904
Title:
Teaching Undergraduate Creative Nonfiction Writing: A Rhetorical Enterprise
Author:
Fodrey, Crystal N.
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project presents the results of a case study of creative nonfiction (CNF) pedagogical practices in undergraduate composition studies and creative writing courses at The University of Arizona, exploring how those who teach CNF at this top-ranked school for the study of the genre are shaping knowledge about it. This project analyzes within a rhetorical framework the various subject positions CNF teachers assume in relation to their writing and teaching as well as the teaching methodologies they utilize. I do this to articulate a theory of CNF pedagogy for the twenty-first century, one that represents the merging of individualist and public intellectual ideologies that I have observed in teacher interviews, course documents, and pedagogical publications about the genre. For students new to the genre, so much depends on how CNF is first introduced through class discussion, representative assigned prose models, and invention activities when it comes to creating knowledge about exactly what contemporary CNF is/can be and how writers might best generate prose that fits the genre's wide-ranging conventions in form, content, and rhetorical situation. Understanding how and why instructors promote certain ideologies in relation to CNF becomes increasingly important as this mode of personally situated, fact-based, narrative-privileging, literarily stylized discourse continues to gain popularity within and beyond the academy.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Creative Nonfiction; Creative Writing; Higher Education; Pedagogy; Rhetoric; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Composition Studies
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTeaching Undergraduate Creative Nonfiction Writing: A Rhetorical Enterpriseen_US
dc.creatorFodrey, Crystal N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFodrey, Crystal N.en_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project presents the results of a case study of creative nonfiction (CNF) pedagogical practices in undergraduate composition studies and creative writing courses at The University of Arizona, exploring how those who teach CNF at this top-ranked school for the study of the genre are shaping knowledge about it. This project analyzes within a rhetorical framework the various subject positions CNF teachers assume in relation to their writing and teaching as well as the teaching methodologies they utilize. I do this to articulate a theory of CNF pedagogy for the twenty-first century, one that represents the merging of individualist and public intellectual ideologies that I have observed in teacher interviews, course documents, and pedagogical publications about the genre. For students new to the genre, so much depends on how CNF is first introduced through class discussion, representative assigned prose models, and invention activities when it comes to creating knowledge about exactly what contemporary CNF is/can be and how writers might best generate prose that fits the genre's wide-ranging conventions in form, content, and rhetorical situation. Understanding how and why instructors promote certain ideologies in relation to CNF becomes increasingly important as this mode of personally situated, fact-based, narrative-privileging, literarily stylized discourse continues to gain popularity within and beyond the academy.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCreative Nonfictionen_US
dc.subjectCreative Writingen_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.subjectPedagogyen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
dc.subjectComposition Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Anne-Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRamirez, Cristinaen_US
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