Studies of Copper-Cobalt Mineralization at Tenke-Fungurume, Central African Copperbelt; and Developments in Geology between 1550 and 1750 A.D.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/319897
Title:
Studies of Copper-Cobalt Mineralization at Tenke-Fungurume, Central African Copperbelt; and Developments in Geology between 1550 and 1750 A.D.
Author:
Fay, Hannah Isabel
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The contents of this dissertation fall into two broad areas: geology and history of geology. Although apparently unrelated, the two categories in fact parallel one another. The development of geological systems finds a mirror, on a shorter timescale, in the development of the human understanding of geological systems. The present state of a science - like the present state of an earth system - represents the concatenation of many subtle or evident processes and influences operating over time. Moreover, the events of the past condition the state of the present in science as well as in objects of scientific study. Thus, for instance, to understand why we now hold certain interpretations about the formation of sediment-hosted copper deposits, we must study not only the deposits themselves but the historical development and the philosophical concerns that guided and shaped modern thought about them. In this dissertation the geological and historical aspects are presented in sequence rather than juxtaposed. The geological section comes first, with three chapters detailing the formation and development of the Tenke-Fungurume Cu-Co district and the Central African Copperbelt, followed by another taking a broad view of the mineralogical, geochemical, and metallurgical implications of some of the geological features there. Then follows the history of geology: first two chapters on the role of Georgius Agricola in founding modern geology, and one on how it developed through the following centuries in tune with simultaneous developments in other sciences.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
cobalt; copper; economic geology; ore deposits; Theory of the Earth; Geosciences; Agricola
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barton, Mark D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleStudies of Copper-Cobalt Mineralization at Tenke-Fungurume, Central African Copperbelt; and Developments in Geology between 1550 and 1750 A.D.en_US
dc.creatorFay, Hannah Isabelen_US
dc.contributor.authorFay, Hannah Isabelen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe contents of this dissertation fall into two broad areas: geology and history of geology. Although apparently unrelated, the two categories in fact parallel one another. The development of geological systems finds a mirror, on a shorter timescale, in the development of the human understanding of geological systems. The present state of a science - like the present state of an earth system - represents the concatenation of many subtle or evident processes and influences operating over time. Moreover, the events of the past condition the state of the present in science as well as in objects of scientific study. Thus, for instance, to understand why we now hold certain interpretations about the formation of sediment-hosted copper deposits, we must study not only the deposits themselves but the historical development and the philosophical concerns that guided and shaped modern thought about them. In this dissertation the geological and historical aspects are presented in sequence rather than juxtaposed. The geological section comes first, with three chapters detailing the formation and development of the Tenke-Fungurume Cu-Co district and the Central African Copperbelt, followed by another taking a broad view of the mineralogical, geochemical, and metallurgical implications of some of the geological features there. Then follows the history of geology: first two chapters on the role of Georgius Agricola in founding modern geology, and one on how it developed through the following centuries in tune with simultaneous developments in other sciences.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectcobalten_US
dc.subjectcopperen_US
dc.subjecteconomic geologyen_US
dc.subjectore depositsen_US
dc.subjectTheory of the Earthen_US
dc.subjectGeosciencesen_US
dc.subjectAgricolaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarton, Mark D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarton, Mark D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSeedorff, C. Ericen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIntosh, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMazdab, Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchuh, Wolframen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHayes, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRossi, Michaelen_US
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