Intimate Encounters: Ayoreo Sex Work in The Mennonite Colonies of Western Paraguay

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/319895
Title:
Intimate Encounters: Ayoreo Sex Work in The Mennonite Colonies of Western Paraguay
Author:
Canova, Paola
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 05-May-2019
Abstract:
Locals in Filadelfia, the urban center of western Paraguay's Mennonite Colonies, see the public presence of indigenous Ayoreo `sex workers' as a moral stain on the city and a major social problem. These young women's practices upend local perceptions as well as established theoretical categories of sex work. They treat interactions with male `friends' not as `work' but as `play,' they do not see their practices as morally fraught; and they move in and out of the activity, until they leave it behind and marry within their own group. This dissertation, based on 49 months of long-term fieldwork, examines the cultural meanings of `sex work' among Ayoreo young women to understand how colliding ethical systems, framed by five decades of Ayoreo engagement with the market economy and intense Christianization shape the cultural production of gender and sexuality, and notions of exchange and the commoditization of bodies. Ayoreo `sex work' does not fit conventional academic models, which reduce such activity to proof of economic necessity or women's stigmatization of women. Rather than being a form of feminine submission or exploitation, it is a unique cultural phenomenon constructed in a web of social relations forged through processes of cultural change, religious hegemony, and economic shifts experienced by the Ayoreo over the twentieth century.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Ethics; Indigenous Peoples; Paraguay; Sexuality; Anthropology; Ayoreo
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheridan, Thomas E.; Silverstein, Brian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIntimate Encounters: Ayoreo Sex Work in The Mennonite Colonies of Western Paraguayen_US
dc.creatorCanova, Paolaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCanova, Paolaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 05-May-2019en_US
dc.description.abstractLocals in Filadelfia, the urban center of western Paraguay's Mennonite Colonies, see the public presence of indigenous Ayoreo `sex workers' as a moral stain on the city and a major social problem. These young women's practices upend local perceptions as well as established theoretical categories of sex work. They treat interactions with male `friends' not as `work' but as `play,' they do not see their practices as morally fraught; and they move in and out of the activity, until they leave it behind and marry within their own group. This dissertation, based on 49 months of long-term fieldwork, examines the cultural meanings of `sex work' among Ayoreo young women to understand how colliding ethical systems, framed by five decades of Ayoreo engagement with the market economy and intense Christianization shape the cultural production of gender and sexuality, and notions of exchange and the commoditization of bodies. Ayoreo `sex work' does not fit conventional academic models, which reduce such activity to proof of economic necessity or women's stigmatization of women. Rather than being a form of feminine submission or exploitation, it is a unique cultural phenomenon constructed in a web of social relations forged through processes of cultural change, religious hegemony, and economic shifts experienced by the Ayoreo over the twentieth century.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoplesen_US
dc.subjectParaguayen_US
dc.subjectSexualityen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectAyoreoen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheridan, Thomas E.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSheridan, Thomas E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverstein, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPark, Thomas K.en_US
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