Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/317544
Title:
Arizona Water Resource Vol. 18 No. 1 (Winter 2010)
Author:
University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
2010
Description:
Includes insert: USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3076, National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Dissolved Solids in Basin-Fill Aquifers and Streams in the Southwestern United States - Executive Summary.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/317544
Additional Links:
https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awr
Abstract:
Agriculture faces a conundrum: populations needing food are increasing and the necessary land and water resources to produce crops are not. What to do? The perplexing situation was addressed recently in an article in the November Scientific American, titled, “Growing Skyscrapers: The Rise of Vertical Farms.” Author Dickson Despommier says an insufficient supply of arable land is available to feed a projected 9.5 million population by 2050. Agricultural practices causing environmental harm contribute to the problem. His solution is to grow food indoors in glass high-rises; he figures that a 30-story structure located on one square block could be as agriculturally productive as 2,400 outdoor acres, with less spoilage. Crops could be grown year-round on these vertical farms under rigorously controlled conditions. He is proposing an agricultural revolution with an urban twist: high-rise vertical farms would be located in urban areas on now vacant lots and multi-story greenhouses constructed on rooftops. Food would be grown using non-mechanized farming techniques and relying on recycled urban wastewater in areas with the greatest demand, thus reducing transportation costs. This means less fossil fuels consumed and less emissions. Urban life would become more sustainable. Techniques for growing crops in-doors — drip irrigation, aeroponics and hydroponics— have been successfully applied throughout the world. Despommier singles out for special notice the 318-acre Eurofresh Farms located in Arizona that produces bountiful and varied crops 12 months a year. He mentions the Southwest with its abundant sunshine as being especially hospitable to vertical farming. He would modify his structures in the region to two or three stories, 50 to 100 yards wide and miles long to maximize natural sunlight for growing and photovoltaics for power. Despommier also describes the paths best not to take. He says that intensive, highly mechanized industrial farming capable of producing a greater yield of genetically-modified crops fertilized by agrochemicals is not the answer. Nor is the further deforestation of land to produce farmland. Both have severe environmental consequences. Despommier summarizes: “Vertical farming could revolutionize how we feed ourselves and the rising population to come.” For another, more here-and-now perspective of Arizona agriculture and its future water needs see above sidebar. It notes a recent CAST issue paper (Council for Agricultural Science and Technology) titled “Water, People, and the Future: Water Availability for Agriculture in the United States.”
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Arid regions -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Water-supply -- Arizona.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-28T00:03:44Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-28T00:03:44Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/317544-
dc.descriptionIncludes insert: USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3076, National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Dissolved Solids in Basin-Fill Aquifers and Streams in the Southwestern United States - Executive Summary.en_US
dc.description.abstractAgriculture faces a conundrum: populations needing food are increasing and the necessary land and water resources to produce crops are not. What to do? The perplexing situation was addressed recently in an article in the November Scientific American, titled, “Growing Skyscrapers: The Rise of Vertical Farms.” Author Dickson Despommier says an insufficient supply of arable land is available to feed a projected 9.5 million population by 2050. Agricultural practices causing environmental harm contribute to the problem. His solution is to grow food indoors in glass high-rises; he figures that a 30-story structure located on one square block could be as agriculturally productive as 2,400 outdoor acres, with less spoilage. Crops could be grown year-round on these vertical farms under rigorously controlled conditions. He is proposing an agricultural revolution with an urban twist: high-rise vertical farms would be located in urban areas on now vacant lots and multi-story greenhouses constructed on rooftops. Food would be grown using non-mechanized farming techniques and relying on recycled urban wastewater in areas with the greatest demand, thus reducing transportation costs. This means less fossil fuels consumed and less emissions. Urban life would become more sustainable. Techniques for growing crops in-doors — drip irrigation, aeroponics and hydroponics— have been successfully applied throughout the world. Despommier singles out for special notice the 318-acre Eurofresh Farms located in Arizona that produces bountiful and varied crops 12 months a year. He mentions the Southwest with its abundant sunshine as being especially hospitable to vertical farming. He would modify his structures in the region to two or three stories, 50 to 100 yards wide and miles long to maximize natural sunlight for growing and photovoltaics for power. Despommier also describes the paths best not to take. He says that intensive, highly mechanized industrial farming capable of producing a greater yield of genetically-modified crops fertilized by agrochemicals is not the answer. Nor is the further deforestation of land to produce farmland. Both have severe environmental consequences. Despommier summarizes: “Vertical farming could revolutionize how we feed ourselves and the rising population to come.” For another, more here-and-now perspective of Arizona agriculture and its future water needs see above sidebar. It notes a recent CAST issue paper (Council for Agricultural Science and Technology) titled “Water, People, and the Future: Water Availability for Agriculture in the United States.”en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awren_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleArizona Water Resource Vol. 18 No. 1 (Winter 2010)en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. For more information, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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