Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/317436
Title:
Arizona Water Resource Vol. 15 No. 5 (May-June 2007)
Author:
University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Gelt, Joe; Megdal, Sharon
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
May-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/317436
Additional Links:
https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awr
Abstract:
As if Arizona did not have enough water-supply worries due to population growth and drought, the state is now contending with an application to transfer groundwater from Arizona to Nevada. Of the varied and perplexing issues the requested out-of-state transfer raises, one the most significant and far-reaching is whether Arizona law can protect state water resources from such transfers. This is the first time the state water export law has been put to the test; it very likely won’t be the last. The controversy is being played out in a remote, rugged and sparsely populated corner of Arizona, in the far northwest part of the state, an area where Arizona, Nevada and Utah lie in close proximity.
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Arid regions -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Water-supply -- Arizona.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGelt, Joeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMegdal, Sharonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-24T01:31:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-24T01:31:27Z-
dc.date.issued2007-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/317436-
dc.description.abstractAs if Arizona did not have enough water-supply worries due to population growth and drought, the state is now contending with an application to transfer groundwater from Arizona to Nevada. Of the varied and perplexing issues the requested out-of-state transfer raises, one the most significant and far-reaching is whether Arizona law can protect state water resources from such transfers. This is the first time the state water export law has been put to the test; it very likely won’t be the last. The controversy is being played out in a remote, rugged and sparsely populated corner of Arizona, in the far northwest part of the state, an area where Arizona, Nevada and Utah lie in close proximity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awren_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleArizona Water Resource Vol. 15 No. 5 (May-June 2007)en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. For more information, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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