Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316935
Title:
Leaf Venation Networks Link Climate to Plant Form and Function
Author:
Blonder, Benjamin
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 27-Mar-2015
Abstract:
Within each leaf is an intricate network of veins. The geometry of this network shows large variation across species and environments, paralleling variation in species' functioning and geographic distributions. Here I develop theory that links leaf venation networks to 1) the worldwide leaf economics spectrum, enabling better understandings of the resource tradeoffs that are central to the terrestrial carbon and water cycles, and 2) atmospheric temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations, enabling better use of leaf fossils for paleoclimate reconstruction. I successfully test these theories across contemporary temperate and tropical sites, and apply them to paleo-sites spanning a 2Myr interval across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. These theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that leaf venation networks can provide an integrative framework for understanding relationships between plant form, function, and environment.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enquist, Brian J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLeaf Venation Networks Link Climate to Plant Form and Functionen_US
dc.creatorBlonder, Benjaminen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlonder, Benjaminen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 27-Mar-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractWithin each leaf is an intricate network of veins. The geometry of this network shows large variation across species and environments, paralleling variation in species' functioning and geographic distributions. Here I develop theory that links leaf venation networks to 1) the worldwide leaf economics spectrum, enabling better understandings of the resource tradeoffs that are central to the terrestrial carbon and water cycles, and 2) atmospheric temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations, enabling better use of leaf fossils for paleoclimate reconstruction. I successfully test these theories across contemporary temperate and tropical sites, and apply them to paleo-sites spanning a 2Myr interval across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. These theoretical and empirical results demonstrate that leaf venation networks can provide an integrative framework for understanding relationships between plant form, function, and environment.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnquist, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuxman, Travis E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaleska, Scott R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGill, Brian J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSperry, Johnen_US
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