Intergroup Media Selection: Media Features and Audience's Social Identity Motivations and Gratifications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316934
Title:
Intergroup Media Selection: Media Features and Audience's Social Identity Motivations and Gratifications
Author:
Joyce, Nicholas
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 01-May-2015
Abstract:
Past research has suggested that exposure to media in which the audience can observe positive interactions between a member or their group and a member of an outgroup can have a positive impact on audience attitudes towards the outgroup. This dissertation examines the reasons why individuals might voluntarily watch these types of intergroup media. Participants were exposed to two television show proposals in which three media features were experimentally manipulated: The social comparison between groups, the stereotypicality of outgroup character, and the presence of intergroup romance. The findings indicate that individuals were motivated to consume media that reduced uncertainty about other groups and increased the perceived status of their own. In addition, although not consistent across the two proposed shows, several of the manipulated media features were found to interact and/or relate indirectly to the attractiveness of the television show through the gratification of these motivations. The theoretical relevance and applicability of these findings is discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Media; Social Identity; Uses and Gratifications; Communication; Intergroup
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harwood, Jake T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIntergroup Media Selection: Media Features and Audience's Social Identity Motivations and Gratificationsen_US
dc.creatorJoyce, Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Nicholasen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 01-May-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractPast research has suggested that exposure to media in which the audience can observe positive interactions between a member or their group and a member of an outgroup can have a positive impact on audience attitudes towards the outgroup. This dissertation examines the reasons why individuals might voluntarily watch these types of intergroup media. Participants were exposed to two television show proposals in which three media features were experimentally manipulated: The social comparison between groups, the stereotypicality of outgroup character, and the presence of intergroup romance. The findings indicate that individuals were motivated to consume media that reduced uncertainty about other groups and increased the perceived status of their own. In addition, although not consistent across the two proposed shows, several of the manipulated media features were found to interact and/or relate indirectly to the attractiveness of the television show through the gratification of these motivations. The theoretical relevance and applicability of these findings is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMediaen_US
dc.subjectSocial Identityen_US
dc.subjectUses and Gratificationsen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectIntergroupen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarwood, Jake T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarwood, Jake T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Stephen A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonnerstein, Edward I.en_US
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