Paradoxical Promotions: Age Differences in Children's Responses to Food Advertising Triggering Multiple Health Schemas

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316898
Title:
Paradoxical Promotions: Age Differences in Children's Responses to Food Advertising Triggering Multiple Health Schemas
Author:
Castonguay, Jessica
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study investigated whether exposing children to a television advertisement for a sugar-laden cereal that depicts physical activities influences their perceptions of the promoted food as healthy and appealing differently than exposure to an advertisement for the same product without the depiction of physical activities. Differences in the impact each advertisement had on children's attitudes toward and intentions to exercise were also examined. In addition to testing the straightforward effect of advertising exposure, this study explored the potential for age differences to lead to differing interpretations of advertising messages. A 2 (advertising condition) X 2 (age group) experimental design was employed. Participants were randomly assigned to view an advertisement for Frosted Flakes cereal that either did or did not depict physical activities. They were then offered three snack options, including Frosted Flakes, and asked a series of questions pertaining to their perceptions of the advertised cereal, the depicted physical activities, and more general forms of exercise. Exposure to advertising promoting an unhealthy food alongside portrayals of physical activity had an immediate strengthening effect on children's perceptions of the food's healthfulness. Likewise, younger children held more positive attitudes toward the promoted food when they viewed an advertisement associating it with physical activities. However, children's attitudes toward and intentions to engage in any form of exercise did not differ as a result of the advertisement they had viewed, regardless of the child's age. These findings help to explain prior research showing that children's exposure to food advertising is related to nutritional misperceptions. They are consistent with a growing body of research revealing that children respond favorably to food advertisements that associate a product with healthfulness. These findings contrast with food companies' assertions that promoting physical activity in their marketing is encouraging children to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Children; Obesity; Communication; Advertising
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kunkel, Dale; Donnerstein, Edward

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleParadoxical Promotions: Age Differences in Children's Responses to Food Advertising Triggering Multiple Health Schemasen_US
dc.creatorCastonguay, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastonguay, Jessicaen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated whether exposing children to a television advertisement for a sugar-laden cereal that depicts physical activities influences their perceptions of the promoted food as healthy and appealing differently than exposure to an advertisement for the same product without the depiction of physical activities. Differences in the impact each advertisement had on children's attitudes toward and intentions to exercise were also examined. In addition to testing the straightforward effect of advertising exposure, this study explored the potential for age differences to lead to differing interpretations of advertising messages. A 2 (advertising condition) X 2 (age group) experimental design was employed. Participants were randomly assigned to view an advertisement for Frosted Flakes cereal that either did or did not depict physical activities. They were then offered three snack options, including Frosted Flakes, and asked a series of questions pertaining to their perceptions of the advertised cereal, the depicted physical activities, and more general forms of exercise. Exposure to advertising promoting an unhealthy food alongside portrayals of physical activity had an immediate strengthening effect on children's perceptions of the food's healthfulness. Likewise, younger children held more positive attitudes toward the promoted food when they viewed an advertisement associating it with physical activities. However, children's attitudes toward and intentions to engage in any form of exercise did not differ as a result of the advertisement they had viewed, regardless of the child's age. These findings help to explain prior research showing that children's exposure to food advertising is related to nutritional misperceptions. They are consistent with a growing body of research revealing that children respond favorably to food advertisements that associate a product with healthfulness. These findings contrast with food companies' assertions that promoting physical activity in their marketing is encouraging children to maintain a healthy lifestyle.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectAdvertisingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKunkel, Daleen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDonnerstein, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKunkel, Daleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonnerstein, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidien_US
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