Extending the Self-Regulatory Model Linking High Goals and Unethical Behavior: The Moderating Effects of Goal Commitment and Subconscious Priming

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316775
Title:
Extending the Self-Regulatory Model Linking High Goals and Unethical Behavior: The Moderating Effects of Goal Commitment and Subconscious Priming
Author:
Welsh, David Thomas
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent research has demonstrated that over time, consecutive high performance goals can increase unethical behavior by depleting one's self-regulatory resources (Welsh & Ordóñez, 2014). In this study, I extend the mediated model connecting goals, depletion, and unethical behavior. First, I propose that the depleting effects associated with a single goal can increase depletion and facilitate unethicality both in pursuit of the goal and also in unrelated areas. Second, I draw from the goal-setting literature to hypothesize that high levels of goal commitment will moderate the relationship between high performance goals and depletion by strengthening this effect. Third, I integrate research related to information processing to hypothesize that because automatic processing influences behavior more when participants are depleted, subconscious ethical priming will moderate the relationship between depletion and unethical behavior by attenuating this effect. A laboratory study is presented to test the expanded model combining mediation and moderation, adding to our understanding of the factors that influence the strength of the relationship connecting high performance goals and unethical behavior. Results generally did not support the developed model and a number of potential limitations and directions for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
goals; goal setting; self-regulation; Management; ethics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ordóñez, Lisa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleExtending the Self-Regulatory Model Linking High Goals and Unethical Behavior: The Moderating Effects of Goal Commitment and Subconscious Primingen_US
dc.creatorWelsh, David Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelsh, David Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research has demonstrated that over time, consecutive high performance goals can increase unethical behavior by depleting one's self-regulatory resources (Welsh & Ordóñez, 2014). In this study, I extend the mediated model connecting goals, depletion, and unethical behavior. First, I propose that the depleting effects associated with a single goal can increase depletion and facilitate unethicality both in pursuit of the goal and also in unrelated areas. Second, I draw from the goal-setting literature to hypothesize that high levels of goal commitment will moderate the relationship between high performance goals and depletion by strengthening this effect. Third, I integrate research related to information processing to hypothesize that because automatic processing influences behavior more when participants are depleted, subconscious ethical priming will moderate the relationship between depletion and unethical behavior by attenuating this effect. A laboratory study is presented to test the expanded model combining mediation and moderation, adding to our understanding of the factors that influence the strength of the relationship connecting high performance goals and unethical behavior. Results generally did not support the developed model and a number of potential limitations and directions for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectgoalsen_US
dc.subjectgoal settingen_US
dc.subjectself-regulationen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectethicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOrdóñez, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrdóñez, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEllis, Aleksanderen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPodsakoff, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Stephenen_US
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