Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316488
Title:
Arizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 5 (June 1992)
Author:
University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Jun-1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/316488
Additional Links:
https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awr
Abstract:
The Tohono O'odham (formerly Papago) Nation and the U.S. government filed suit in 1975 against groundwater pumpers in Pima County, seeking tribal water rights under the Winters doctrine. After extensive negotiations, Congress passed the Southern Arizona Water Resources Settlement Act (SAWRSA) in 1982, which called for the Nation to give up its Winters claim in exchange for 66,000 a-f of CAP water, 10,000 a-f of groundwater rights, and financial assistance in putting the water to use. Ten years and millions of dollars later, no water has been delivered, no long-term supply has been identified, no consensus has been reached on how to use the water, the lawsuit has not been dismissed, and Congress is being asked to amend SAWRSA. The most significant change from a decade ago is that today's conflict is not between the Nation and outsiders, but rather is within the Nation.
Type:
text; Newsletter
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Arid regions -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Water-supply -- Arizona.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-05T23:13:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-05T23:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued1992-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/316488-
dc.description.abstractThe Tohono O'odham (formerly Papago) Nation and the U.S. government filed suit in 1975 against groundwater pumpers in Pima County, seeking tribal water rights under the Winters doctrine. After extensive negotiations, Congress passed the Southern Arizona Water Resources Settlement Act (SAWRSA) in 1982, which called for the Nation to give up its Winters claim in exchange for 66,000 a-f of CAP water, 10,000 a-f of groundwater rights, and financial assistance in putting the water to use. Ten years and millions of dollars later, no water has been delivered, no long-term supply has been identified, no consensus has been reached on how to use the water, the lawsuit has not been dismissed, and Congress is being asked to amend SAWRSA. The most significant change from a decade ago is that today's conflict is not between the Nation and outsiders, but rather is within the Nation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awren_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleArizona Water Resource Vol. 1 No. 5 (June 1992)en_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typeNewsletter-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. For more information, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.