Does more “normal” shoulder motion after arthroplasty improve patient satisfaction?: Correlation of range of motion, patient-reported function,and patient satisfaction following shoulder arthroplasty.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315934
Title:
Does more “normal” shoulder motion after arthroplasty improve patient satisfaction?: Correlation of range of motion, patient-reported function,and patient satisfaction following shoulder arthroplasty.
Author:
Winsor, Kimberly
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objective and Hypothesis The goals of this study are to address the following questions regarding shoulder arthroplasty (TSA): (a) Does restoring range of motion (ROM) lead to increased patient satisfaction? (b) How is ability to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs) influenced by ROM? (c) How does ADL performance correlate with patient satisfaction? We hypothesize that more “normal” ROM following TSA leads to increased patient satisfaction and better performance of ADLs. Methods Patients who underwent TSA, reverse TSA, hemiarthroplasty, or humeral head resurfacing were prospectively enrolled in a shoulder arthroplasty registry. 155 patients who had preoperative and 6 month postoperative data for ROM, patient satisfaction, and performance of ADLs were included in the study. Results Of these 155 shoulders, the response rate for patient satisfaction was only 82 (52.9%), with 96.8% reporting they were “satisfied or “very satisfied”. Postoperative ROM was associated with patient satisfaction for forward flexion, adduction, and external rotation. This association demonstrated a “dose;response” relationship, as higher percentage of normal ROM correlated with higher satisfaction. Mean ADL scores were higher for patients who achieved normal ROM in each plane of motion. The greatest improvement in mean ADL score occurred when a patient achieved normal ROM for at least 3 of 5 measurements. There was also a significant association between improved ADL and higher patient satisfaction. Significance Glenohumeral arthrosis causes considerable morbidity, and rates of shoulder arthroplasty are increasing. As the predominant goals of TSA are pain relief and restoration of ROM, it is important to assess postoperative patient satisfaction. While most historic studies have focused on measures of implant performance, interest is increasing in patient-centered outcomes. Both objective and subjective outcomes should be included in future large multicenter registries. Data collected from these registries has the potential to substantially improve success rates and longevity of shoulder arthroplasty.
Keywords:
Patient reported function; Shoulder motion
MeSH Subjects:
Arthroplasty; Patient Satisfaction; Range of Motion, Articular
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Tibor, Lisa MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDoes more “normal” shoulder motion after arthroplasty improve patient satisfaction?: Correlation of range of motion, patient-reported function,and patient satisfaction following shoulder arthroplasty.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWinsor, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2013 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective and Hypothesis The goals of this study are to address the following questions regarding shoulder arthroplasty (TSA): (a) Does restoring range of motion (ROM) lead to increased patient satisfaction? (b) How is ability to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs) influenced by ROM? (c) How does ADL performance correlate with patient satisfaction? We hypothesize that more “normal” ROM following TSA leads to increased patient satisfaction and better performance of ADLs. Methods Patients who underwent TSA, reverse TSA, hemiarthroplasty, or humeral head resurfacing were prospectively enrolled in a shoulder arthroplasty registry. 155 patients who had preoperative and 6 month postoperative data for ROM, patient satisfaction, and performance of ADLs were included in the study. Results Of these 155 shoulders, the response rate for patient satisfaction was only 82 (52.9%), with 96.8% reporting they were “satisfied or “very satisfied”. Postoperative ROM was associated with patient satisfaction for forward flexion, adduction, and external rotation. This association demonstrated a “dose;response” relationship, as higher percentage of normal ROM correlated with higher satisfaction. Mean ADL scores were higher for patients who achieved normal ROM in each plane of motion. The greatest improvement in mean ADL score occurred when a patient achieved normal ROM for at least 3 of 5 measurements. There was also a significant association between improved ADL and higher patient satisfaction. Significance Glenohumeral arthrosis causes considerable morbidity, and rates of shoulder arthroplasty are increasing. As the predominant goals of TSA are pain relief and restoration of ROM, it is important to assess postoperative patient satisfaction. While most historic studies have focused on measures of implant performance, interest is increasing in patient-centered outcomes. Both objective and subjective outcomes should be included in future large multicenter registries. Data collected from these registries has the potential to substantially improve success rates and longevity of shoulder arthroplasty.en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectPatient reported functionen_US
dc.subjectShoulder motionen_US
dc.subject.meshArthroplastyen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articularen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorTibor, Lisa MDen_US
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