Correlating IVC Measurements with Intravascular Volume Changes at Three Distinct Measurement Sites

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315932
Title:
Correlating IVC Measurements with Intravascular Volume Changes at Three Distinct Measurement Sites
Author:
Yang, Kimberly
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Bedside ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC) has grown to be an important tool in the assessment and management of critically ill patients. This study endeavors to examine which location along the IVC is most highly correlated with changes in intravascular volume status: (1) the diaphragmatic juncture (DJ) (2) two centimeters caudal to the hepatic vein juncture (2HVJ) or (3) left renal vein juncture (LRVJ). Data was collected in this prospective observational study on patients in the emergency department who were at least 16 years of age, being treated with intravenous fluids (IVF). Measurements of the IVC were recorded at each site during standard inspiratory and expiratory cycles, and again with the patient actively sniffing to decrease intrapleural pressures. IVF was then administered per the patient’s predetermined treatment, and the same six measurements were repeated after completion of fluid bolus. The difference in caval index (dCI) was calculated for all six data sets and correlated with the mL/kg of IVF administered. There was a statistically significant correlation between mL/kg of IVFs administered and dCI at all three sites (DJ: r = 0.354, p value = 0.0002; 2HVJ: r = 0.334, p value = 0.0003; LRVJ: r = 0.192, p value = 0.03). The greatest correlation between amount of fluids administered and dCI was observed along the IVC at the site 2 cm caudal to the juncture of the hepatic veins (2HVJ). This site is also where the largest change in diameter can be appreciated on ultrasound during intravascular volume resuscitation. Our data also suggests that every mL/kg of IVFs administered should change the dCI by 0.86-1.00%. This anticipated change in IVC diameter can be used to gauge a patient’s response to intravascular volume repletion.
Keywords:
Intravascular volume status; Measurement site
MeSH Subjects:
Vena Cava, Inferior; Ultrasonography
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Wu, Teresa MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCorrelating IVC Measurements with Intravascular Volume Changes at Three Distinct Measurement Sitesen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractBedside ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC) has grown to be an important tool in the assessment and management of critically ill patients. This study endeavors to examine which location along the IVC is most highly correlated with changes in intravascular volume status: (1) the diaphragmatic juncture (DJ) (2) two centimeters caudal to the hepatic vein juncture (2HVJ) or (3) left renal vein juncture (LRVJ). Data was collected in this prospective observational study on patients in the emergency department who were at least 16 years of age, being treated with intravenous fluids (IVF). Measurements of the IVC were recorded at each site during standard inspiratory and expiratory cycles, and again with the patient actively sniffing to decrease intrapleural pressures. IVF was then administered per the patient’s predetermined treatment, and the same six measurements were repeated after completion of fluid bolus. The difference in caval index (dCI) was calculated for all six data sets and correlated with the mL/kg of IVF administered. There was a statistically significant correlation between mL/kg of IVFs administered and dCI at all three sites (DJ: r = 0.354, p value = 0.0002; 2HVJ: r = 0.334, p value = 0.0003; LRVJ: r = 0.192, p value = 0.03). The greatest correlation between amount of fluids administered and dCI was observed along the IVC at the site 2 cm caudal to the juncture of the hepatic veins (2HVJ). This site is also where the largest change in diameter can be appreciated on ultrasound during intravascular volume resuscitation. Our data also suggests that every mL/kg of IVFs administered should change the dCI by 0.86-1.00%. This anticipated change in IVC diameter can be used to gauge a patient’s response to intravascular volume repletion.en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectIntravascular volume statusen_US
dc.subjectMeasurement siteen_US
dc.subject.meshVena Cava, Inferioren_US
dc.subject.meshUltrasonographyen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorWu, Teresa MDen_US
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