Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315902
Title:
Interpregnancy Interval and Neonatal Outcomes
Author:
Hefley, Erin
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: Interpregnancy interval (IPI), the time period between the end of one pregnancy and the conception of the next, can have a significant impact on maternal and infant outcomes. This study examines the relationship between interpregnancy interval and neonatal outcomes of low birth weight, preterm birth, and specific neonatal morbidities. Study Design: Retrospective cohort study comparing neonatal outcomes across 6 categories of IPI using data on 202,600 cases identified from Arizona birth certificates and the Newborn Intensive Care Program data. Comparisons between groups were made using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and multivariable logisitic regression analysis. Results: Interpregnancy intervals of < 12 months and ≥ 60 months were associated with low birth weight, preterm birth, and small for gestational age births. The shortest and longest IPI categories were also associated with specific neonatal morbidities, including periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, apnea bradycardia, respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, and suspected sepsis. Relationships between interpregnancy interval and specific neonatal morbidities did not remain significant when adjusted for birth weight and gestational age. Conclusions: Significant differences in neonatal outcomes (preterm birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age) were observed between IPI categories. Consistent with previous research, interpregnancy intervals < 12 months and ≥ 60 months appear to be associated with increased risk of poor neonatal outcomes. Any difference in specific neonatal morbidities between IPI groups appears to be mediated through increased risk of low birth weight and preterm birth by IPI.
Keywords:
Interpregnancy Interval; Neonatal Outcomes
MeSH Subjects:
Infant, Low Birth Weight; Premature Birth
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Coonrod, Dean MD, MPH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInterpregnancy Interval and Neonatal Outcomesen_US
dc.contributor.authorHefley, Erinen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Interpregnancy interval (IPI), the time period between the end of one pregnancy and the conception of the next, can have a significant impact on maternal and infant outcomes. This study examines the relationship between interpregnancy interval and neonatal outcomes of low birth weight, preterm birth, and specific neonatal morbidities. Study Design: Retrospective cohort study comparing neonatal outcomes across 6 categories of IPI using data on 202,600 cases identified from Arizona birth certificates and the Newborn Intensive Care Program data. Comparisons between groups were made using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and multivariable logisitic regression analysis. Results: Interpregnancy intervals of < 12 months and ≥ 60 months were associated with low birth weight, preterm birth, and small for gestational age births. The shortest and longest IPI categories were also associated with specific neonatal morbidities, including periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, apnea bradycardia, respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, and suspected sepsis. Relationships between interpregnancy interval and specific neonatal morbidities did not remain significant when adjusted for birth weight and gestational age. Conclusions: Significant differences in neonatal outcomes (preterm birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age) were observed between IPI categories. Consistent with previous research, interpregnancy intervals < 12 months and ≥ 60 months appear to be associated with increased risk of poor neonatal outcomes. Any difference in specific neonatal morbidities between IPI groups appears to be mediated through increased risk of low birth weight and preterm birth by IPI.en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectInterpregnancy Intervalen_US
dc.subjectNeonatal Outcomesen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Low Birth Weighten_US
dc.subject.meshPremature Birthen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorCoonrod, Dean MD, MPHen_US
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